Category Archives: Websites

Thinkfinity

Thinkfinity has been one of my “go-to” sites for many years, ever since its infant stage as Marco Polo.  It is a wonderful resource for teachers use for finding interesting lesson ideas based on national standards.  It has several content partners, including “Read, Write, Think” and “Illuminations“.  You can choose certain partners to search, the grade level, the standards, etc…Whenever you are looking for a new idea to add a spark to your lesson, this is definitely one place you should visit.

 

Bloom’s Taxonomy Tech Pyramid

In case you haven’t seen it, this Tech Pyramid has great ideas for technology tools that you can use at each level of Bloom’s Taxonomy.  When you go to the site, each of the icons are linked.  It’s a great visual to help teachers in planning lessons that integrate technology based on the levels you want to address.

Spelling City

I am not a huge fan of spelling tests, particularly when everyone in the class is responsible for the same words.  However, this site has some amazing tools that will allow you to customize lists for your students.  There are also fun games that they can play to practice those specialized lists.  The site is free, although you need to register.  There are some perks for purchasing a premium membership, but it can still be a valuable tool without all of the bells and whistles.

Producer’s Toolbox

Created by Kim Ball, a teacher of Gifted and Talented students in San Antonio’s North East Independent School District, The Producer’s Toolbox is a great resource for anyone, teacher or student, who is interested in creating multimedia presentations.  It has links to video, audio, and research sites, as well as other fun extras.

Weebly

Weebly is a site specifically designed for students to create their own websites.  It will host their sites for free, and is extremely user-friendly.  Ideas for differentiation with this site?

  1. Teachers can create their own websites on the site, designing different pages with different assignments for students based on ability levels or multiple intelligences.  This could be an alternative to a menu or tic-tac-toe board.
  2. Students can create their own websites as final products for independent studies based on rubrics.

 

 

 

Math Pickle

I haven’t had a chance to try this one with students, yet, but it shows great promise.  With videos of different math challenges and supporting resources for K-12, this site has great potential for allowing students to do some independent critical thinking.