Resources and Lessons for Fiction Reading

I actually found the link to Beth Newingham’s blog post on another blog, KB Connected.  When I clicked on the link, I was immediately impressed by the creative ideas and the higher order thinking skills each activity included.  In addition, Beth Newingham provides photos of each activity and printables that are simple but attractive.  It has links to her website showing several of the fiction genre lessons in action.  This is the kind of classroom in which kids thrive!

Math Moves U

This website is fun to visit for the graphics alone!  It is sponsored by Raytheon, and designed specifically to engage middle school students in math and science.  It offers games, scholarship information, and much more.  Students can register to earn credits with their games, or they can play as guests.  Even clicking on different links on this site produces interesting visuals that are sure to catch the attention of kids and grownups alike.

TED

If you have not visited www.ted.com, or downloaded the app, please do so as soon as you can.  The site is full of inspirational, though-provoking videos on a plethora of topics.  Of course, it is always advisable to preview a video before you make it available to your students, but TED also includes interactive transcripts that you can skim for any objectionable content.  Larry Ferlazzo had a great post recently on his blog that included various resources to accompany the TED talks, including a wiki in which teachers share their ideas for using it in the classroom.

Guess the Wordle

What a Great Idea!Whether you use the Wordle riddles that “Jen” has created, or set off to make some of your own, this is a great concept that integrates technology with practically any topic you are learning.  You could use your Wordles to introduce a topic or to review something that has already been taught.  You could have students create their own Wordles that others need to guess.  One of the cool, and quite simple, features on this site is the way that she embedded the Wordles in her blog so that when you roll over them the answer appears.  This can be done when you add the alternate text to a picture you are inserting in your blog or website.  Of course, Wordle is not the only site that creates word clouds.  Tagxedo is another fun way to make these, and allows you to format them to different shapes.

The Joy and the Challenge: Parenting Gifted Children

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Though this book is technically for parents, I think that teachers could use a lot of the information as well. At the very least, it could be a resource offered to parents at a conference about their gifted child. This is a free e-book, which can be downloaded in various formats or even viewed on the internet. It has a lot of links to other resources, and it is an easy read with common sense advice.

S.C.O.R.E. Cyberguides

S.C.O.R.E. Cyberguides is a site that was produced by Schools of California Online Resources for Education.  It is based on California’s Language Arts curriculum, and offers a multitude of  literature units at levels from K-12.  The units include teacher and student resources.  They could be used as supplemental materials, or as jumping off points for Literature Circles or independent study assignments.  There is a disclaimer on the site that lack of funding has resulted in some of the units being out of date (broken links, etc…).  However, it appears that even those units are still available on the site under “Retired” sections.  This is helpful as a teacher could scavenge them for curriculum ideas or website suggestions.

UPDATE 7/6/14:  It looks like this link no longer works.  If any of you find a link to these guides that does work, please let me know, as they are a valuable resource!

Khan Academy

Khan Academy is a revolutionary approach to teaching which advocates “Flipping the Classroom”.  You can view the TED video below to learn about the humble beginnings of the Academy on YouTube, and the ambitious plans Mr. Khan now has for his free service.  Basically, the site has hundreds of video lessons indexed in which Mr. Khan explains a variety of topics – mostly math and science related.  If you have a G-mail or Facebook account, you can become a Coach.  Your students, who would also have to register with one of these e-mail addresses, can complete exercises on the site at their own pace.  As the Coach, you can monitor their progress using several different tools included in the registration portion of the site.  Even if you don’t want to register, this is a fabulous resource for allowing students to learn at their own pace, or even for reteaching and reviewing topics.

Great Minds Don't Think Alike!

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