Stump the Professor

“Stump the Professor” is one of several free downloads available from The Positive Engagement Project, a site that “is equipped with a variety of tools for teachers to get their students positively engaged in active learning.”  The free downloads are all thorough activity packets designed to help with engaging students.  Each packet that I reviewed included explanations, examples, and templates.  “Stump the Professor” detailed a review game in which students design the questions.  Another one that I liked was “True and False – Three Points of Proof”.  In this activity, the students are given the answers to questions from reading passages, and then must prove why the answers are correct and the other alternatives are not.  Teachers can also find activities for math and character education on the site.

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Reteach and Enrich

This video, hosted by Edutopia, offers an interesting model for differentiating for students in mathematics – giving the ones who need extra help the opportunity for more time to learn while the students who have mastered a concept can go deeper.  This is a fascinating alternative to the “Intervention Time” that many schools have been implementing.  With this method, all students have their needs addressed, instead of just the ones who need additional practice.

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Scholastic’s The First Thanksgiving

Give your students a virtual field trip to the First Thanksgiving by visiting this in-depth resource from Scholastic.  Students can read letters from pilgrims, view videos with “Miles Standish” and other pilgrims, and take a field trip to Plimouth.  There are lots of resources and free printables for teachers as well.  This is a great way for the students to immerse themselves in history instead of relying on social studies textbooks.

Geography Awareness Week

Next week, November 13-19, is Geography Awareness Week.  I think we can all agree that we could stand to brush up on our geography skills.  This site, produced by National Geographic, has some great activities for doing that.  You can print out a booklet of “missions”, or go to the online version.  The wording in the booklet is fun, and the missions are very creative.  For example, one mission is titled, “Alien Invasion”, in which the student is tasked to “Photograph evidence of where a non-native plant or animal has invaded a local ecosystem. Produce a ‘spotter’s guide’ to these invasive species.”  Many of the missions would make great activities any time of the year, so don’t feel restricted to squeezing all of your geography education into one week!

APPitic

The website describes its purpose best:  APPitic is an directory of apps for education by Apple Distinguished Educators (ADEs) to help you transform teaching and learning. These apps have been tested in a variety of different grade levels, instructional strategies and classroom settings.”

On this site, you can browse for apps by: Preschool, Themes, Multiple Intelligences, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and Tools.

Each reviewed app of the over 1,300 gives a thorough description, and many have personal comments from the Apple Distinguished Educators who have used them in their own classroom settings.

APPitic is a good resource for teachers, especially when used along with some of the other app review sites mentioned in my Educational App Reviews post.

Cranium Club

I came across this classroom idea while I was playing with Pinterest.  Ms. Noble has a great method for reviewing concepts and challenging minds that she thoroughly explains on her website.  Although I would probably modify some of the activities, and add some more higher order thinking skills, this shows a lot of potential for motivating students and making sure that learning time is maximized.

What Teachers Make

Taylor Mali, author of "What Teachers Make"

I’ve seen versions of this floating around the web from time to time, but KB Connected just posted one that I hadn’t seen yet.  It’s a very powerful poem by Taylor Mali, and the video incorporates text and photos in a way that really “packs a punch”, so to speak.  It will inspire and motivate you if you are a teacher.  I can also see certain contexts in which it would be valuable to show to students.  Be aware that there is a word that, though changed in the text, can still be easily inferred from the audio, so this would not be a video to show young children.
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Great Minds Don't Think Alike!

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