A Taxonomy of Reflection

I came across this post, and thought it was intriguing.  I know that I am often guilty of not giving my students enough time to reflect on their work.  This is an interesting blend of Bloom’s Taxonomy and reflective questions.  The post also includes questions for the teacher and the principal to use about their own practices.  You can scroll to the bottom of the page for a basic understanding, or you can click on each of the links for more thorough explanations.  Be sure to check out Peter Pappas’ Prezi, as it includes an entertaining clip from The Simpsons demonstrating an extremely non-reflective student!

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Comparison Search

Today’s post comes from the same people who provide “Boolify”, which I highlighted yesterday.  In Comparison Search, the researcher gets the added benefit of searching for web sites that may have different points of view on the same topic.  It allows you to type in a keyword or phrase, such as “genetic engineering”, and to then choose the positive and negative search terms you would like to use, such as “advantages” and “disadvantages”.  The search results are then given in two columns, respective to your search terms.  As I mentioned yesterday, these searches are not “safe searches”, so teachers in primary grades probably should not let their students loose on this tool.  However, it can be quite valuable in trying to teach a lesson on the objectivity, or lack of it, on many websites.

Boolify

Considering that the first part of its name is “Boo”, Boolify should probably have been yesterday’s Halloween post.  It is still a timely site, however.  Boolify is a simple tool for teaching students how to do web searches using basic Boolean Search Operators.  There is the tool, itself, on the home page, as well as a few other resources under the “Lessons” link.  The search results come from Bing, so this is not a “safe search” tool.  However, it would be good to use for demonstration purposes with younger students.  Older students may enjoy the simplicity of the tool, as well.  This might be a good tool to use with Kentucky Virtual Library’s “How to do Research” site.

100 Reasons to Mind Map

Mind mapping is a great skill for all ages, and this site will show you pretty much all of the ways in which it can be useful.  There is even a poster that you can download of the 100 reasons.  And, if you are looking for some other free printables, head on over to I.Q. Matrix, where you can download some very creative and elaborate mind maps, such as the “How-to-Mind-Map” mind map!

Manga High

I learned about Manga High a few weeks ago, but wanted to explore it more before sharing it.  Now that I’ve had a chance to delve into it a little, I can’t wait for everyone else to try it!
Manga High is a free math resource for K-12.  Teachers can register entire classes, and no student e-mails are necessary to create their accounts.  Once the teacher manually adds each student, or uploads the class using a spreadsheet, the teacher can then select levels for each student to “play”.  Students can earn achievements by playing the math games.  The teacher has access to class reports, and individualized ones that would be useful for conferencing.
I’m going to start giving my gifted students in 5th grade access to it next week to pilot it.  Please let me know if you use it, and what your own feelings are about this seemingly indispensable tool!

Educational App Reviews

As we begin to incorporate more mobile devices into our classrooms to engage our students, the question becomes, “What apps will be appropriate for the needs of my students?”  Sorting through the apps available on sites such as iTunes in the Education category can be very time-consuming.  In the past few weeks, I have come across some websites that try to make the job of finding meaningful apps for children easier for teachers and families.
Proshas 4 different platforms to choose from: App Store, Android, YouTube and Computer, allows users to add app reviews, can filter categories, levels, price, and language, can sort by new, recommended, review, or alphabetic
Consmust register (for free) to suggest apps, does not have a large selection yet
Pros:  can choose App Store, Android, or both, can filter by free, paid, highest rated, most popular, or APProved, can browse by category or age group, seems to have a large catalogue, gives a lot of information – both objective and subjective – about each app
Cons: not specifically designed for educators, although it does have an Education category, does not appear to have any teachers as reviewers (the site is designed for families rather than educators)
Pros: can choose category, can choose specific grade level, trying to work with developers to increase the quantity and quality of educational apps
Cons:  seems to be mostly App Store offerings (I didn’t see any Android apps), does not allow to filter for platform or sort by ratings, price, or popularity (though these should be coming soon), still limited on number of reviews (just starting out)
Pros: lots of meaty suggestions for using apps in the classroom with examples and links, written by an Instructional Technology Specialist in N.E.I.S.D. (shout out!) in San Antonio who was a former classroom teacher, very creative ideas for integration, most ideas have been teacher-tested
Cons: due to the high quality of each post, there is a lower volume of reviews than you will find on the other sites, limited to App store

60 Graphic Organizers

This is a great resource for differentiating.  Many teachers use graphic organizers, but there are a few here that I’ve never seen – such as the jigsaw puzzle.  Changing things up always grabs the students’ attention.  To apply this to different abilities in your classroom you could try the following levels, in order from least ability to greatest ability:

  • organizer that is pre-filled
  • organizer that is attached to a worksheet with the different words or phrases for the students to cut out and apply
  • blank organizer with no word bank
  • select your own organizer and fill out

I have tried the last one in my classroom, and the students love being given the option to choose.  It is interesting to see how they can apply the same information in several different types of diagrams.

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