Drawing Drawer

The Drawing Drawer is an idea that will be appealing to teachers of all levels who are familiar with the classic, “What are we supposed to do when we’re done?”  Marty Reid has provided a list of fun ideas for kids who finish their work early.  They include suggestions like:  “Draw a picture of something you’d like to become better at doing,” or “Draw your greatest fear.”  The trick, of course, is balancing the motivational value of this concept with the expectation of quality from the main assignment.  However, with a little practice and clear expectations, this could be a great way to add some creativity to the daily routine.  While you are visiting Marty’s page, you might also want to check out some of the other great ideas at www.incredibleart.org!

Advertisements

Respondo

Respondo is a new tool brought to you by the creator of The Differentiator, Ian at www.byrdseed.com.  As Ian describes on the Respondo page, he is still working on this tool, and welcomes any suggestions.  However, from what I can see, it is a great way to incorporate creative thinking into responses to literature.  It is based on the S.C.A.M.P.E.R. technique I posted about a few weeks ago, and which Ian describes in his post called “Do More with Story Structure.”  Give Respondo a try the next time you want to “jazz up” your literature discussions!

Martin Luther King, Jr. Resources

In the United States, many of us will be celebrating the life of Martin Luther King Jr. next Monday.  Here are a few resources that can help our students to understand the impact this great man has had on our nation:

A simple interactive timeline with quotes for younger kids (grades 2-5)

National Geographic for Kids Video – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Remembered

MLK Animated Video Below (can also be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=k6Au81aHuSg#!)  Choose full screen, so comments are not viewable by students.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

The Orange County Register Interactive (one of the many links from Larry Ferlazzo’s Best Websites for Learning about Martin Luther King, Jr.)

Read Write Think – Lesson resources for MLK Day (scroll to the bottom to find more resources for various grade levels)

100 Minutes of Genius

My last post was about the concept of applying Google’s 20% Policy to the classroom.  100 Minutes of Genius is a similar idea.  Tia Henriksen got the idea of calling it “Genius Hour” from another educator, Mrs. Krebs, who is referenced on this blog post.  Also, there are links to how Mrs. Krebs introduced the idea to her students and a report of their progress that includes a Rubric of Creativity.  This appears to be an idea that is spreading like wildfire, and I think that it can be adapted to many different types of learning situations.  Giving students more choices that allow for creativity could be a way to reignite the passion for learning in our country.

The Twenty Percent Project

Last year, a friend of mine told me about Google’s 20% Policy, and I immediately thought of its applications for the classroom.  It was among many of my ideas that I had for the new school year that just didn’t come to fruition.  And now, I find that a teacher named AJ Juliani had the same inspiration – but is actually following through with it.  You can read all about Google’s Policy, and how Mr. Juliani is applying it with his students here on the “Education is My Life” blog.  Be sure to read the comments that follow, as well.  It makes for an interesting discussion!

Craftsmanship Rubric

This “Craftsmanship Rubric” is a great visual to use to help your students to see what your expectations are for their artwork.  Kathleen O’Malley, the creator of this neat chart, recommends that you produce your own text to describe each picture.  Another thought might be to ask your students to help you to come up with the descriptors for each level.

Tribbs Lite

I saw Tribbs Lite reviewed on the Appitic site under Multiple Intelligences, and decided to give it a try. For students who love math, this free app for the iPad is a great brain exercise.  I am putting it in the Grades 3-12 category because, as an adult, even I found it addictive. My third graders tested it out today, and enjoyed the challenge.  Basically, you are given a target number, and have to find three numbers that will make that target number by using any of the operations.  The number choices are in a grid, and you have to choose numbers that are neighbors.  You get more points the faster and more accurately you solve the puzzle.

%d bloggers like this: