APPitic

The website describes its purpose best:  APPitic is an directory of apps for education by Apple Distinguished Educators (ADEs) to help you transform teaching and learning. These apps have been tested in a variety of different grade levels, instructional strategies and classroom settings.”

On this site, you can browse for apps by: Preschool, Themes, Multiple Intelligences, Bloom’s Taxonomy, and Tools.

Each reviewed app of the over 1,300 gives a thorough description, and many have personal comments from the Apple Distinguished Educators who have used them in their own classroom settings.

APPitic is a good resource for teachers, especially when used along with some of the other app review sites mentioned in my Educational App Reviews post.

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Cranium Club

I came across this classroom idea while I was playing with Pinterest.  Ms. Noble has a great method for reviewing concepts and challenging minds that she thoroughly explains on her website.  Although I would probably modify some of the activities, and add some more higher order thinking skills, this shows a lot of potential for motivating students and making sure that learning time is maximized.

What Teachers Make

Taylor Mali, author of "What Teachers Make"

I’ve seen versions of this floating around the web from time to time, but KB Connected just posted one that I hadn’t seen yet.  It’s a very powerful poem by Taylor Mali, and the video incorporates text and photos in a way that really “packs a punch”, so to speak.  It will inspire and motivate you if you are a teacher.  I can also see certain contexts in which it would be valuable to show to students.  Be aware that there is a word that, though changed in the text, can still be easily inferred from the audio, so this would not be a video to show young children.
Vodpod videos no longer available.

A Taxonomy of Reflection

I came across this post, and thought it was intriguing.  I know that I am often guilty of not giving my students enough time to reflect on their work.  This is an interesting blend of Bloom’s Taxonomy and reflective questions.  The post also includes questions for the teacher and the principal to use about their own practices.  You can scroll to the bottom of the page for a basic understanding, or you can click on each of the links for more thorough explanations.  Be sure to check out Peter Pappas’ Prezi, as it includes an entertaining clip from The Simpsons demonstrating an extremely non-reflective student!

Comparison Search

Today’s post comes from the same people who provide “Boolify”, which I highlighted yesterday.  In Comparison Search, the researcher gets the added benefit of searching for web sites that may have different points of view on the same topic.  It allows you to type in a keyword or phrase, such as “genetic engineering”, and to then choose the positive and negative search terms you would like to use, such as “advantages” and “disadvantages”.  The search results are then given in two columns, respective to your search terms.  As I mentioned yesterday, these searches are not “safe searches”, so teachers in primary grades probably should not let their students loose on this tool.  However, it can be quite valuable in trying to teach a lesson on the objectivity, or lack of it, on many websites.

Boolify

Considering that the first part of its name is “Boo”, Boolify should probably have been yesterday’s Halloween post.  It is still a timely site, however.  Boolify is a simple tool for teaching students how to do web searches using basic Boolean Search Operators.  There is the tool, itself, on the home page, as well as a few other resources under the “Lessons” link.  The search results come from Bing, so this is not a “safe search” tool.  However, it would be good to use for demonstration purposes with younger students.  Older students may enjoy the simplicity of the tool, as well.  This might be a good tool to use with Kentucky Virtual Library’s “How to do Research” site.

100 Reasons to Mind Map

Mind mapping is a great skill for all ages, and this site will show you pretty much all of the ways in which it can be useful.  There is even a poster that you can download of the 100 reasons.  And, if you are looking for some other free printables, head on over to I.Q. Matrix, where you can download some very creative and elaborate mind maps, such as the “How-to-Mind-Map” mind map!

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