Agamographs

My students have done agamographs in the past, but I always called them “pictures that show two perspectives.”  It’s nice to learn there is an official name for these that has fewer syllables.  There are many ways to integrate this art form into other subjects – showing cause and effect in science or literature, or different historical perspectives, for example.  To see great directions for making agamographs, check out this set from Babble Dabble Do.  You can see some beautiful examples made by middle school students here.  If you are ready to hop on trying this out, you might want to consider making agamograph Valentines.

Of course, if you Google “agamograph” you will find many more examples.  Apparently everyone on the internet knew what they were called except me 😉

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CC BY-SA 4.0], from Wikimedia Commons

How Learning Happens

The “How Learning Happens” series on Edutopia has a set of videos that show teachers in action as they model simple – but powerful – strategies for learners of all ages.  One of the more recent posts is, “Inviting Participation with Thumbs-Up Responses.”  This no-tech strategy where students show their thumbs-up/down answers at their belly instead of high up in the air helps learners to feel safe while giving the teacher instant formative feedback on their understanding of the lesson.  Having gone from teaching where my students practically fought each other to speak to me to an environment where I hear crickets after every question, I loved watching this caring teacher show us how to encourage students to engage without fear.  Student response apps are great, but sometimes we just need a quick way to gauge what our students are thinking.

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Operation Valentine

Operation Valentine is an adorable project on Instructables that can be used for grades 3 and up to teach the basics of electrical circuits just in time for Valentine’s Day.  You may recall the post that I did that included some of the Operation projects my co-worker, Kat Sauter, did with the 8th grade science teacher.  The Instructables project from mathiemom is definitely more manageable with younger students.  Maybe your students can make these for their Virtual Valentines projects, or in addition to some of these other STEM projects for the young at heart 🙂

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Cup-Stacking Teamwork

I came across this cup-stacking activity from Jaclyn Sepp when I was looking for some ways to help the students work on teamwork.  I did it with 5 different classes of 8th grade students with various levels of success.  (Note to self – don’t have the cups on the table while you are trying to give directions.)  I found that it definitely works better with at least 5 students in a group, and that they love making challenges for other groups once they have completed the first two! (Link at the bottom of her post will take you to the second challenge.)

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The Art of Engineering

There aren’t any fancy graphics on this video, but I love the message that Katie Correll gives in this short presentation.  I keep trying to convince my students that engineering is so much more than math and science, that’s it’s not just about following formulas and rules but about learning how to use them to innovate and sometimes even break those rules.  One of my students pointed out that Katie’s message about thinking outside of the box to problem solve can really apply to anyone – not just engineers.

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Stoke Deck

Stanford’s d.school is one of my go-to resources for anything creative, so I was a bit surprised when I found this particular one completely by accident.  I was looking for unique team-building tools, and “Stoke Deck” popped up.  This free printable has 28 different activities that will help students to “Boost Energy, Create Focus, Get Personal, Nurture Camaraderie, and Communicate Mindsets.”  They are each short exercises that can be used before starting a lesson – or even as a quick break during instruction.  Some of them, like “Blind Disco,”  may require some an established history of trust before you try them.  Others, like “Long Lost Friends,” might be good for introductions.  Almost all of them were new to me, so I can’t wait to try them!

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image from Pixabay

Cartoon Network Projects for Playground Express

If you read last year’s “Gifts for the Gifted” posts, then you may remember that one of my suggestions was Circuit Playground Express.  After publishing the post, I found out that there was an e-book published by Rob Merrill with some fun ideas for different ways to use this product, which is an awesome introduction to development boards.  I added the update to that post, but I found out this week that the Cartoon Network has developed seven new projects to try out with the Circuit Playground Express.  Whether you have a child who received one of these as a gift or you are a teacher who wants to offer more options for ways to learn how to use this product, these tutorials might appeal to you.  In addition, there is a link to a Flipgrid where students can share their own versions of each project.

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Circuit Playground Express shared by Adafruit on Flickr
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