More About Wakelet

I’ve been using Wakelet since late last year (2020) primarily as a curation tool, and wrote about all of the features that I like in this September post. As I know that I need to read about things a few times before I try them, I thought I would revisit this tool in today’s blog post so I could remind you of its amazing-ness, let you know about some features you may not have tried yet, and inform you about what’s new.

Wakelet is far more than a bookmarking tool, though it certainly does that well. As you can see in my description from September, this free app and website is extremely versatile, allowing users to curate images, social media posts, websites, text, PDF’s, and more from pretty much any internet-connected device. What I didn’t really emphasize in my previous post, though, was the education-friendliness of Wakelet. Take, for instance, its Immersive Reader tool, which is embedded so that any text can be read aloud. Another example is its integration with Flipgrid so that users can add video on the fly to a Wakelet. Collaboration between peers, between students and teachers, and crowd-sourcing for research or sharing resources are all possible with Wakelet. Portfolios like this one can be made by students.

If you want more ideas for ways to use Wakelet, the Tweet embedded below, by @TxTechChick has a nice visual:

The above list, as well as simple instructions for using Wakelet, can be found in the recently released e-book. In other Wakelet news, you can now “react” to collections and items in Wakelet. For up-to-the-moment information, follow the company @Wakelet, and visit their blog.

Here is a link to my Wakelet of items about Wakelet. You can visit this page to see all of my public Wakelet collections. I hope that you will see the value in this tool and give it a try!

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