Category Archives: Teaching Tools

17 Free Printables for Thanksgiving

To justify the hours that I spend looking for “just right” activities for my gifted students, I try to share as much as I can on this blog.  Yesterday I hunted for critical and creative thinking activities with a Thanksgiving theme, and found quite a few that you can print for free.

From Minds in Bloom (Rachel Lynette) on Teachers Pay Teachers:

From Growing Gifted Minds on Teachers Pay Teachers:

From various other authors on Teacher Pay Teachers:

From other sources:

Some of my past Thanksgiving posts:

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image from PublicDomain.net
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I’m Just No Good at Rhyming

If you think it’s rotten to be sad,

Here’s a book to make you glad.

Chris Harris tried to write a poem.

(It’s okay if you don’t really know him.)

In truth he wrote more than one,

(poem)

And they are more than just a little fun.

(not ho hum)

Lane Smith did every illustration,

Except maybe went on vacation

For the “Alphabet Book” portion –

Kind of a surprise distortion

Of what you might have expected,

But let’s not get redirected.

From author’s note to the last rhyme,

Read and laugh and postpone bedtime.

Your kids will love this cheerful book

More than a chef loves to bake.

I highly recommend I’m Just No Good at Rhyming and Other Nonsense for Mischievous Kids and Immature Grown-Ups by Chris Harris, illustrated by Lane Smith, for your child or your classroom.  It’s clever and fun, a refreshing book that will make you smile.  To hear more, you can listen to Harris’ interview with Scott Simon on NPR here.

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Purchase the book here

 

Empatico Registration Open

In July, I posted about a website, Empatico, which endeavors to match classrooms around the world.  The site is now offering free registration for teachers of 8-10 year olds who would like to participate.  There are four “Spark” activities to choose from. Empatico provides the lesson plan and downloadable resources for each one.  When you register, you select the activities that seem a good fit for your class, as well as the days of the week and times that will work for a live internet chat with another group of students working on the same project.  Empatico will e-mail you once the organization finds another classroom with similar interests so that you can then arrange a specific day and time for the students to virtually meet.

To register, visit Empatico, and click on any of the hyperlinks that offer, “Get matched with a class.”  It is recommended that you choose more than one activity in order to get matched more quickly.  Although this project is just beginning, it has a lot potential for helping students to see other perspectives and develop empathy.  According to the site, “As students learn together, they explore their similarities and differences with curiosity and kindness and develop practical communication and leadership skills.”  Programs like this can promote more understanding around the world, something that seems to be urgently needed in today’s society.

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#wgoitgraph

“What’s Going on in this Graph?” is a new feature from the New York Times that will appear on the second Tuesday monthly for the rest of this school year.  Building on the success of a long-running similar activity,  “WGOITPicture,” this version posts a graphic that has appeared recently in the NYT, with much of the information removed.  Students are encouraged to analyze the image by thinking about these three questions:

  • What do you notice?
  • What do you wonder?
  • What’s going on in this graph?

There is a comment section where students over 13 years old, (or teachers) may post their observations, questions, and extrapolations.  A moderator from the American Statistical Association gives online feedback on the day the graphic is posted, and then the actual details are revealed at the end of the week.

The first “What’s Going on in this Graph?” was posted yesterday.  According to the caption, it has some connection to Hurricane Harvey – but what, exactly?  That is for your students to try to discern.  From the comments I have read so far, there are some extremely perceptive students attempting to decipher the graph’s meaning; it will be fun to see the answer on Friday!

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Engage

Engage is a two minute video from “Let it Ripple” Film Studio (also the producers of The Science of Character).  It’s a good reminder that we only have a short time on this planet, so it’s important to make that time meaningful by helping others.  Accompanied by the soundtrack of, “Give a Little Bit,” by Rodger Hodgson, Engage might be the little nudge of inspiration that your students need to become more involved in the world around them. A similar video, which you can also find on my “Inspirational Videos for Students” Pinterest Board, is “The Time You Have (in Jellybeans).”

H/T to @ibceendy for sharing this link on Twitter!

Engage
from Engage by Let It Ripple

Skype in the Classroom Bingo Cards

One of your goals this new school year may be to “flatten” your classroom walls by making more global connections.  “Skype in the Classroom,” which I blogged about earlier this year, is a great way to get started.  The site now offers Bingo Cards as a resource that you can print out for your students to keep track of all of the fantastic Skype experiences they have throughout the year. You can also use a bingo card to get a nice collection of ideas for Skype sessions!  There are teacher instructions, and there is even a set of cards that you can use for professional development.  All of these downloadable PDF’s are free, and just the tip of the iceberg when you explore everything that “Skype in the Classroom” has to offer!

Skype Bingo

Good Thinking!

The Smithsonian Science Education Center worked with Fablevision Studios and science experts to produce the web series, Good Thinking!  The Science of Teaching Science.  Each of the short (about 6-10 minutes) animated videos is designed to address a common student idea or misconception about science.  For example, one video disproves the unfortunately common “neuromyth” of people being either right-brained or left-brained –  “Why Right-Brained is Wrong… Brained.”   Each video offers detailed references regarding the research it is based on, as well as a professional development guide. Although the target audience of these videos is science teachers, some of them may also be good to show students.  Before you embark on your next science unit, take a moment to explore Good Thinking! The Science of Teaching Science to find out how to make your lessons even better.

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from: Good Thinking!  The Science of Teaching Science