Category Archives: Creative Thinking

IDEO Lifeline Cards

If you really want to take your feedback, reflections, critiques, etc… to a whole new level, you should consider using these IDEO Lifeline Cards.  I haven’t used them with my students yet, but just asking myself the questions made me think about my own work differently.  The cards are free (and quite beautiful), so download them while you can.  Even if the questions are a bit too high level for your particular student age group, applying them to your own life is an intriguing exercise and may give you some insight you have never considered.

eye-1173863_1920.jpg

Advertisements

Makey Makey Exit Ticket/Data Tracker

Colleen Graves (@gravescolleen) shared some pictures on Twitter a few days ago that showed prototypes she was making of a library data tracker and a classroom exit ticket tracker.  Both use the Makey Makey along with some minimal Scratch programming.  I begged for some more details, and she has released the instructions here. (That sentence makes it sound like she only published the directions because I asked, but I’m pretty sure the two events just happened in chronological order because Colleen planned it that way – not because I have the power to demand anyone to explain things in detail just so I can copy their ideas.)

Colleen, by the way, is now the Content Creator/Director of Community and Creative Content at Makey Makey.  She has already authored a few books, one of which is 20 Makey Makey Projects for the Evil Genius.  For one of my posts that curated links of creative ways to use the Makey Makey, click here.  You also might enjoy this one about interactive onomatopeia.

makeymakey.jpg
image from Alan Levine on Flickr

 

Making It

Could the fact that I just noticed the title of this NBC show is a double entendre be in any way related to the fact that I now spend my days teaching teenagers?

Hmm.

It could just be that Nick Offerman and Amy Poehler hosting a show about amazing makers distracted me from any other interpretation of the title other than crafting incredible stuff.

If you are a STEMer, STEAMer, or STREAMer, you should definitely take a peek at this weekly show to get some inspiration.  Though it is not directly related to education, you will get some ideas of what is possible with a little bit of imagination and a lot of glitter and balsa wood.

You can stream the episodes here if you don’t have NBC or Hulu.  So far, my favorite has been Episode 2, in which the makers were challenged to design forts and corresponding toys for children.  The versatility and creativity of each entry blew me away.  I am really glad I’m not one of the judges.

If you love watching people rip each other apart or run naked through the woods, then this show might not be your cup of tea.  But if you enjoy seeing people who appear to be genuinely nice and sometimes a little bit goofy produce amazing works of art with unusual tools and supplies, “Making It” should be your goal for tonight.

Okay, that didn’t quite come out the way I meant it.  But you can take it any way you want.  I’m not in charge of your personal life.  Most of the time I’m not even in charge of mine.

doll-1016692_1920.jpg
This image isn’t from the show, but I’m dedicated to using copyright free images. (Thanks, Pixabay!)

Global Student Voice Film Festival

The Global Student Voice Film Festival is a competition for students ages 5-18. Hosted by the Student Voice Organization, of which Jennie Magiera is president, this contest is in its second year.  Last year’s theme was, “In Another’s Shoes,” and I highly encourage you to view the winners.  For the 2018-2019 contest, students will create 60 second films with the theme of, “Activating Change.” You can access the rules here.  Of particular note is the optional Dec. 17th deadline.  Entries received by that date will receive feedback from the judges, and be given the opportunity to revise their films to be turned by April 9th.  Participants who don’t meet the December deadline have a hard deadline of February 18th.

The goal of this contest is to amplify student voices, but it is also to reinforce respect for intellectual properties, so any use of images, video, or music in the film that are not created by the contestants are subject to strict copyright guidelines.

If you have students who are passionate about film production and/or making a difference, the Global Student Voice Film Festival would be a great project for them.

banner-1155437_1920.png

Creativity Land

For her Genius Hour project, one of my 5th grade students questioned what the world would be like without creativity.  Since she used Scratch for last year’s project (on Sleepwalking), I told her that she needed to present her information in a different way, but that she could still use Scratch for part of her project.  Whereas she used Scratch to give her information about her topic last year, she decided to use Animaker this year.  However, she chose to use Scratch for the “interactive” portion of her presentation (I always insist that there be a part that involves the audience), and blew me away with the complexity of her game.  She designed “Creativity Land,” which includes five interactive games that help students learn the information she gave in her videos.  This. Was. Not. For. A. Grade.  She did this purely out of her love for learning and creating.  English is her second language – maybe third, because imagination is certainly her first.

If you don’t do Genius Hour with your students, you are missing out on something amazing.  And so are your students.

creativityland
Click here to play this game by Olivia T.

826 Digital

Dave Eggers, award-winning author of books such as A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, explains in his 2008 TED Talk, “Once Upon a School,” how he conceived the idea of a tutoring and creative writing center that would be part of the community, a place that would offer one-on-one help to the students in the area with writers who would volunteer their time.

 The center, with its pirate storefront and ever-increasing list of dedicated tutors, was a success.  It grew into more centers around the United States, providing “under-resourced communities access to high-quality, engaging, and free writing, tutoring, and publishing programs.”  As quickly as it has grown, however, 826 National has an even more ambitious goal – to provide its inspirational creative-writing resources to teachers everywhere.  To that end, the company launched “826 Digital” in November of 2017, a website that offers innovative “sparks” and lessons ready to be used in classrooms to galvanize generations of writers of all ages.  Aligned with the Common Core, the unique activities include field-tested resources from Dave Eggers, educators, and volunteers at 826 National sites.

826 Digital is a “pay-as-you-wish” site, which means that teachers can become members for free or whatever they choose to donate.  With lesson titles like, “MIRACLE ELIXIR: INVENTING POTIONS TO CURE BALDNESS AND OTHER THINGS THE WORLD NEEDS RIGHT NOW,” students cannot help but be intrigued and motivated to write.  Sparks like, “CHEESY POP SONG POETRY,” and “MONSTER SCATTERGORIES” will contribute to a classroom environment of humor and creativity.

Your students may not be able to go to the original 826 Valencia pirate store, or the Brooklyn Superhero Supply Company, but you can make your own classroom into a writer’s room that encourages imagination by accessing the great resources available at 826 Digital.826digital

 

Doodle 4 Google 2018

You have less than 2 days to vote for this year’s Doodle 4 Google contest winners.  This year’s theme is , “What inspires me.”  This is a great opportunity to show your students the incredible creativity that is exemplified by the chosen finalists from K-12. And, even though the deadline to enter has passed, you can take advantage of the free educator materials to guide your students as they create their own Google doodles.  Are you done with standardized testing for the year?  Looking for ways to engage your students as the school year comes to a close?  This is definitely one way to do it!

doodle.PNG