Tag Archives: creativity

Montague Workshop

You may recognize Brad Montague (@thebradmontague) as the creator of the outstanding Kid President videos.  But his creativity and compassionate work with kids does not stop there.  He and his wife have begun a “Joyful Rebellion” with the Montague Workshop.  What began as a series of videos has evolved into 8 resources for teachers that include the Montague Workshop videos, lesson plans, and activities written by teachers.  As the website declares, “Our aim is to be the Alfred to your Batman.”

I don’t know about you, but I feel like a Joyful Rebellion is exactly what we need right now!

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Disruptus

Disruptus is one of my new favorite games.  It’s great for Brain Breaks and to jump start brainstorming sessions.  I’ve used it with my younger and older students, and it has been a hit with all of them so far. Like Anaxi, which I reviewed here, it is produced by Funnybone Toys.  You can find it at specialty toy stores and periodically on Amazon.

The game consists of heavy-duty cards that each have a picture on them, a cube, and a timer.  You can read the instructions on the Funnybone website.  There are different versions of gameplay.  So far, my students have enjoyed just watching me roll the cube under the document camera and selecting random cards.  Then I set the timer (I think it’s about 2 minutes), and they scramble to draw or write ideas on scratch paper.  Then we share the ideas.  If you want to make it competitive, you can play it similar to Apples to Apples, where one person is the judge and selects what he or she thinks was the most creative idea.

Here are the options on the faces of the cube that you might roll:

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My first graders were playing the “Create 2” and we pulled out a picture of a toilet and a picture of a steering wheel.  You can imagine the ideas they generated for combining those!

You know those early finishers who don’t have enough time, really, to start something else – but still have enough time to distract the students still working?  Put this under the document camera to think about when done, and tell them you will discuss everyone’s answers as an exit ticket, in the line for the bathroom, or any other transition time during the day.

There are lots of grins and laughs when we do this.  Most importantly, the students are exercising their divergent thinking skills which, too often, don’t get enough use during the school day.

For more activities similar to this, check out this post on Mockups, how to use Flippity for Makerspace Challenges, and these 5 Resources for Design Thinking Challenges.

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Build to Learn

Sometimes random themes show up in the various social networks that I follow.  Today, I came across two completely different posts that appealed to my appreciation for creative ways for students to show their learning.

First, I saw this tweet:

I like the idea of making poetry 3-dimensional, and I could see lots of ways to go with this idea.

Then, I saw a tweet from Russel Tarr about “Tubular Timeline Towers,” an idea one of his students designed for an open-ended homework assignment.  What a great way to represent something chronologically!

The wheels are turning in my brain as I try to think of variations on this theme!

Mockups

In that creepy way that Amazon has of knowing all about you, it recommended Mockups to me when I was searching for another brainstorming game someone had recommended on Twitter.  The original game was not available, so I thought I would give Mockups a try instead.

Mockups is a good game to practice Design Thinking.  It includes cards of three different colors.  Pick a card of each color, and you suddenly have a Design Thinking Challenge.  A white card tells you the person you are designing for, the gray card tells you what to design, and the black card will give you a constraint for that design.

As an example, I just randomly selected: Adventurous Preschoolers, A Way to Keep Their Hands Warm, Absorbent.  There are suggested “games” to play using the card, such as giving the challenge to teams to come up with the best answer or making groups work silently on creating a solution.  Of course, you can use the cards however you want.

This can be a fun way to encourage creativity, and students can learn empathy and new vocabulary as they design.  The suggested ages, according to Amazon, are 6+.  I took out the card, “bartenders,” but didn’t see any others that were objectionable.

For some other Makerspace challenge ideas, check out this recent post.

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Mockups can be purchased here.

Gifts for the Gifted 2017 – Extraordinaires

A few years ago, I thought I would help out the parents of my gifted and talented students by writing about some games, toys, or books that I thought might make good purchases during the holiday season.  I called the series of posts, “Gifts for the Gifted,” and I have continued to do it annually on every Friday in November and December.  These gifts are suggestions for any child – not just those who qualify for a GT program. Sometimes I receive a free product for review, but I am not paid for these posts, and I never recommend a product that I wouldn’t buy for my own child.  For past “Gifts for the Gifted” posts, you can visit this page.

If you have a child who enjoys drawing, Extraordinaires may be just the gift for him or her.  This unique kit encourages Design Thinking by providing Character cards (Extraordinaires), Project Cards, Think Cards, and Idea Pad, and a case. (Included supplies vary, depending on the set.)  Children can choose an Extraordinaire and a Project to design for that character.  Empathy is encouraged by suggesting the designer should first study the Extraordinaires card closely to learn anything that might be helpful in creating a personalized design for the character.  Think Cards can be used to help the designer consider improvements or tweak that can be made to the design.  Inventing a “backstory” for the character is also recommended.

We have used the Buildings Set and the Design Studio in my 2nd and 4th grade classes.  The students really enjoy choosing from the unusual cartoon-like Extraordinaires, and quickly become close to the fictional characters they’ve selected.  These sets definitely spark the imagination – especially for children who love to invent, draw, and/or write.

There are currently three Extraordinaires sets available at different price points.  There is also a free app available that allows designers to see and share projects.  If you scroll to the bottom of this page, you can download a sample project for children to try.

If you want your child to spend more time “unplugged” and creating, Extraordinaires is definitely a worthwhile gift option.

 

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image from Extraordinaires.com

Adapt Your Classroom for a New “Pet”

My 2nd graders have been learning about physical and structural adaptations in nature.  To exercise their creativity, I asked them to brainstorm wild animals that would make unusual class pets.  Then they were asked to draw our classroom with adaptations for the pet.  The twist was that they could not actually draw the animal in the classroom.  The rest of us tried to guess the “pets” by using clues in their pictures and the descriptions that they wrote.  I was proud of their varied ideas and some of the incredible details they added to the drawings.  I’ve included some examples below.  (I love how the first student decided the most unusual animal he could think of would be an alien from outer space!) . Usually, my students have a difficult time with the “Adapt” part of S.C.A.M.P.E.R., but this activity proved to be really fun and they couldn’t wait to share their work.  I’m definitely putting this in the file, “Do Again Next Year!”

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The Power of Design

One of my favorite podcasts is “TED Radio Hour” on NPR, on which each episode examines TED talks that address a particular theme.  Last week, the theme was, “The Power of Design,” and I found many parts applicable to education.  The show includes Tony Fadell, who speaks about the thought processes that went into the first iPod, and Janine Benyus, who speaks about what designers can learn from nature (very applicable to my 2nd grade unit on structures), and three other TED speakers.  Alice Rawsthorn speaks about the rebellious natures of the best designers – such as Blackbeard.  Yes, the pirate.  You can thank Blackbeard for the skull and crossbones.

I have been thinking about innovation and creativity quite a bit, and how I can help my students to try to be more original and less derivative.  Listening to this podcast reminded me of this recent interview with Quentin Tarantino when he was asked for his advice. “My advice for when you want to find a story you want to tell is: What is a movie you want to see?” Tarantino said. “What is it that you want to contribute? There’s a whole lot of movies you could see without you. What’s the movie that we have never seen because you haven’t made it. Make that movie. Make the movie that’s the reason you’re going to be doing it.”

What’s the ______________ that we have never seen because you haven’t made it?  The story, the invention, the picture, the school, the educational system…  Fill in the blank with what you want to design.