Tag Archives: creativity

How to Be More Creative

Here is a nice infographic from Visualistan.com

How To Be More Creative #InfographicYou can also find more infographics at Visualistan

Navigating Uncertainty

In the opening keynote of ISTE 2017, Jad Abumrad, creator and co-host of RadioLab, spoke about the creative process.  He reminded us that all creators regularly oscillate between excitement and self-doubt.  As Abumrad described some of his experiences developing stories for the RadioLab podcast, I couldn’t help but be reminded of the many Genius Hour projects I’ve done my best to facilitate over the years.  Beginning with brainstorming questions, selecting one that resonates, researching the question, and running into obstacles, RadioLab is the embodiment of my students’ attempts to complete their quests for answers.  And, just as my students sometimes run into perceived dead ends, so do the hosts of RadioLab.  But by paying close attention, they may find paths that lead to something even better.  As Abumrad says, “If you commit to the questions, you probably will not get to where you want to go, but you could get somewhere else.  And it could be beautiful.” (This is why I think it’s important to tell students to “Get Lost” and advocate for Trailblazing.)

Our job as educators is to not only help our students “navigate uncertainty,” but to teach them to seek it out.  Abumrad calls this, “The German Forest,” (based on an extremely difficult story he pursued regarding Wagner’s “Ring Cycle”).  Going into the forest is always intimidating, yet exhilarating when you are able to make it to the other side.  The more often you subject yourself to this, the better equipped you will be.  Though the trials may never get easier, you will be able to reassure yourself that you have encountered this before – and succeeded.

During his presentation, Abumrad showed a favorite video of mine that features Ira Glass speaking about storytelling.  Glass’ German Forest is “The Gap,” and it can only be bridged by constantly creating and endlessly honing your craft.

These are the lessons that we must impart to our children:

  • Seek out what interests you, and be willing to take it where it leads you – even if that is not what you envisioned
  • Take calculated risks
  • It is normal to be uncertain, and to question your abilities
  • Allow self-doubt to guide you to improvement rather than to stop you from trying

To those ends, ISTE promotes its students’ standards, which you can learn more about in the awesome Flocabulary video embedded below.

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Chat Pack for Kids

As a parent or a teacher you may find yourself in situations when you need to “kill time.” One tool that I like to use is, “Chat Pack for Kids.”  You can find versions of this from different companies, but I really like this one because it is reasonably priced, the cards are small, and the topics really seem to appeal to people of all ages.  My students who are in robot camp with me this summer enjoy taking out the plastic case that I keep the cards in and asking each other some of the questions, but it’s also a good activity as we wait for parent pick-up.  We all have fun thinking about some of the different scenarios posed, such as what animal we would choose to miniaturize to have as a pet or the one thing that we could change about school.  I try to model creative thinking by offering off-the-wall answers, and we all learn a bit about each other at the same time.  Whether you’re on a long road trip, or just waiting with your class for pictures to be taken, the “Chat Pack for Kids” is a fun way to keep occupied.

I’m going to add this to my Pinterest Board of Games and Toys.

chatpack.jpg
Chat Pack for Kids

Once an Artist

A couple of weeks ago, my Kinder students were working on their #Awards.  One boy looked over at another one, who was carefully drawing details on his paper.

“Are you an artist?” the first student asked with admiration in his voice.

“I used to be one,” the five-year-old responded, matter-of-factly.

“Really?” asked his awestruck fan.

“Yes.  When I was 2 all I did was scribble-scrabble, but then when I was about 3 1/2, I became an artist.”

“Wow!” Fanboy said.  “Why aren’t you one anymore?”

“Well, I ran out of paper,” Once-an-Artist said.  He paused.  “And ideas,” he added.

Then he looked me straight in the eyes.

“But I’m working on getting more,” he solemnly vowed.

I was reminded of this conversation when one of my tweeps, @TEKnical_Lit, shared the link to this powerful video.  Like my Once-an-Artist student, it makes me sad – but hopeful.

Alike short film from Pepe School Land on Vimeo.

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image from Pixabay

PicCollage Game Boards

The PicCollage (or PicKids) app is a versatile tool that my students have used for reflection, creating visuals for a report, and telling stories.  Recently, I’ve seen a couple of different articles on the web about students and teachers using PicCollage to make game boards.  This can range in educational value from creation for fun all of the way to another way to assess learning.  In all cases, creativity can be a part of the activity as students can personalize the boards with photos, stickers, and text.  For some examples and specific integration ideas, check out these two blog posts: “Digital Game Boards with PicCollage” and “Creating and Playing Games on PicCollage.”

Mindset Monopoly
Mindset Monopoly Game created by some of my 3rd Graders (using some Mandala images made by my 4th graders!)

#Awards

One of my absolute favorite bloggers, Joelle Trayers, posted some pictures last week of some Hashtag Awards her Kinder students designed for themselves.  Of course, I couldn’t wait to try the idea myself!  I met with my 1st graders today, and we had a short discussion about hashtags.  Then they designed their own hashtag awards.  In a way, this is similar to a 6 Word Memoir activity because it helps me to learn so much about what is important to my students and how they see themselves.  I might try this at the beginning of the year next time!

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Original Thinkers

“Original Thinkers” is a fascinating TED Talk by Adam Grant, author of Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World.  “The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most – because they are the ones who try the most,” according to Grant.  Using the story of his own failure to invest in a new company that would later become incredibly successful, Adam Grant describes the misconceptions we have about original thinkers, how procrastination can lead to great ideas, and even how the web browsers we use can reveal the inherent creativity in our personalities.

I discovered “Original Thinkers” when I was browsing through the “TED Collections”  section of the Mensa for Kids website.  This page includes 21 links to TED Talk videos and excellent discussion questions and extensions for each one.  I highly recommend you take a look at these fascinating options, as I am sure you will find something that will be of interest to you and your students.  As always, preview the videos before showing them to your class.  (“Original Thinkers” does have the word, “crap” in it – which may or may not be inappropriate for your particular audience.) . I will be adding this to my Inspirational Videos for Kids Pinterest Board, where you can also find many great video resources.

Original Thinkers
Screen Shot from Original Thinkers TED Talk by Adam Grant, showing how different amounts of procrastination affect creativity