Category Archives: Websites

National Poetry Month Ideas

April is National Poetry Month.  Here are a few poetry activities I’ve done in the past that I felt were really worthwhile:

Also, if you are looking for an awesome new-ish poetry book for kids, here is my review of I’m Just No Good at Rhyming by Chris Harris.

ReadWriteThink offers two tools for writing Haikus (an interactive site and an app).

I’m not especially fond of Acrostic Poetry (it usually turns into a list, rather than a poem), but here are some ideas to make Acrostics a bit more rigorous, especially for gifted students:

Or, how about acrostic poems where both the initial and the final letters of each line spell a word?

Here are 30 other ways to celebrate National Poetry Month from Poets.org.

For your own amusement, if you have a Twitter account, check out Poetweet.

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Feebo, Not Chee

Feebo, Not Chee is my latest attempt at doing a Digital Breakout.  Like the previous one, this one is designed for 4th grade students.  Ideally, they would work on it independently.  The pages are not in the same order as the clues, and there are a couple of links to external sites on this one.  If you are an educator who needs answers to this breakout, please e-mail me at engagetheirminds@gmail.com

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Feebo, Not Chee! Digital Breakout Link

Artful Maths

Yesterday’s post about the new OK Go Sandbox made me think about this blog I bookmarked awhile ago.  There is something about the juxtaposition of art and math that fascinates me, so the title of Artful Maths immediately caught my eye.  Under the “Resources” menu you can find, “Mathematical Art Lessons,” which is where I learned of the existence of “cardioids.”  Most of the lessons are accompanied by Powerpoint presentations and downloadable handouts.

Another section of the site I like offers ideas for “Puzzle Games.” This is where I found out about a free iOS game called, “Fibo,” which I am still trying to figure out.  Not all of the game suggestions are free, but you may discover a few new ones that cost little to nothing.

Artful Maths also includes links to origami resources and other mathematical interests.  There are quite a few Christmas decoration ideas on the blog, which I will need to remember for later this year.

Thanks to Clarissa Grandi (@c0mplexnumberfor sharing all of your awesome ideas!

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Artful Maths

OK Go Sandbox

If you have ever seen a music video by “OK Go,” then you cannot fail to be in awe of the band’s incredible creativity.  In every production, you can tell that they spent a lot of time on brainstorming, working hard, and having fun.  Even more notable, though, is how much math and science must be used to create these complex feats of artistic expression.

In cooperation with the Playful Learning Lab at the University of St. Thomas (seriously wish this had been a thing at my university!), OK Go has designed a new website, the OK Go Sandbox, that provides resources for educators to use with students for STEAM activities based on a few of their music videos.

Each of the music videos currently featured on the site has a link to educational materials that include free downloads, challenges for the students, additional videos, and suggested activities.  From making flipbooks to experimenting with sounds made by different “found” instruments, this resource explores the astonishing potential of merging science with art.  Some of the challenges can be used with the Google Science Journal (a free app available for both Android and iOS).

It looks like this is a dynamic project that is encouraging advice from educators, so be sure to visit this page for more information on how to get involved.

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OK Go Sandbox

Leonardo the Leprechaun

I mentioned that I would be trying to create some digital breakouts when I posted this.  Leonardo the Leprechaun is my first attempt, and I thought I would share it with those of you who might be able to use it this week in time for St. Patrick’s Day.

I should tell you that I have already asked my 4th and 5th graders to give this a try, and I made some changes each time based on their feedback.  We definitely had some major issues – one of them being that the new Google Sites is currently blocked in our district.  If your students are unable to access the link, that is probably why, unfortunately.  The other glitches were all my fault, but I’ve hopefully fixed them!

Your students may want to write down the answers they get for each clue, as they will all need to be submitted at the same time in the Google Form.  Also, I’m not revealing any answers here – I don’t want any smart problem-solvers Googling to find them!

I’d be happy to get your feedback here, or you can e-mail me at engagetheirminds@gmail.com

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

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Click here to get to this Digital Breakout!

Thrively Revisited

My first post about Thrively was in 2015.  Since then, the platform has changed a bit.  There is still a free option that includes a Strengths Assessment and links to resources and local activities connected to student interests.  However, there are now journals and online courses, such as, “Find Your Passion” and “Grit.”  There are even more options in Classroom Pro and School Pro that you can see on this pricing comparison page.

I am using Thrively with my 5th grade gifted students.  They completed the Strengths Assessment today and began the “Find Your Passion” course.  With the free version, I have a Teacher Dashboard, so I am able to see their Strength Profiles, Interests, and Aspirations.  I can also read the responses to the journal prompts.  Using the “Class Insights” menu, I can access summaries of class interests and click on each interest to see exactly which students chose each category.  You can also involve parents by inviting them to view their child’s profile.

After discussing the assessment today, one student thanked me for giving him the opportunity to do it.  The entire class was enthusiastic about completing the assessment and continuing with the courses, which are a great tie-in to working on Genius Hour.

Thrively is a great tool to help you learn more about your students – and for them to learn more about themselves.  One student ironically commented that she was pretty certain that she was not assertive like her assessment claimed – until we discussed the meaning of assertive and she realized that it can be a great strength.

Due to the vocabulary and the amount of reading involved, I would not recommend using Thrively with students younger than 5th grade.

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Parallelogram

I learned to love math later in my school career (high school).  I was one of those people who thought I just wasn’t born with the “math gene.”  With the help of great high school mathematics teachers, math became one of my favorite subjects even though it still didn’t come easily to me.  I found that I enjoyed the logic, the challenge, and the satisfaction of solving difficult problems.  In addition (no pun intended), I love teaching math precisely because it doesn’t come easily to me; I think I can communicate the interim steps to the solution in simpler language than someone who has a brain that quickly jumps to answers.

You may have seen my post on 15 Math Sites that Won’t Make You Fall Asleep, which links to many “fun” math pages online.  One of the aspects that I like about many of these sites is that they encourage conversation.  “Parallelogram” is a new one that I need to add to my post.  It is a weekly set of math challenges by Dr. Simon Singh that will be sent to your students for free.  The questions are designed for 11-13 year olds, but I plan to try it with my 4th and 5th grade classes.  Teachers can sign up, and have students join through a class code to be added to a teacher dashboard.  You can get a preview of the program here.  Keep in mind that the match challenges do include video clips, and I always recommend that you preview any videos before showing them to your students.

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Click here to learn more.