3-12, Computer Science, Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, Education, Student Products, Teaching Tools

Cubelets Update

Cubelets

Last November, I published a post about an interesting product by Modular Robotics called, “Cubelets.”  It was included in my “Gifts for the Gifted” series, which I try to do every November and December.  (You can find a collection of these here.)

Cubelets are a bit pricey for a birthday gift, but they make a wonderful addition to the classroom.  If you can get a grant for the large set, I highly recommend it.  Even the smaller set is great for a pair of students to use.  You can find a detailed description of how they work on my previous post.  You can also purchase Cubelets separately.  After some experience with them, I would definitely suggest that you order at least one extra Battery Cubelet with any set you purchase.  Every robot you make with the other cubes needs a Battery Cubelet to power it. The best ratio is to have at least 2 Battery Cubelets for every 4 students.  It makes a great center activity or station in a Maker Studio if you cannot afford more than one set.

S.T.E.M. and Maker Spaces are hot topics in schools today.  Cubelets are great for both.  You can combine the cubes in hundreds of ways, and they are fascinating to use for building all types of robots.  I love listening to the invention ideas and problem solving conversations that arise when my students use them.

You can now purchase “Brick Adapters” for your Cubelets that will allow you to use them with Legos.  That’s going to be the next item in my shopping cart!

Modular Robotics is also about to start shipping their new MOSS product this April, 2014.  I backed MOSS on Kickstarter, and can’t wait to get my kit.  There are 4 mobile apps expected to be released soon for this system.  You can learn more about it here.

I got really pumped a couple of days ago when two of my 3rd graders made a drawing robot out of the Cubelets.  It was completely their invention, and we were so excited to watch it work! I’ve embedded the video below.

Computer Science, Creative Thinking, Critical Thinking, Education, Fun Friday, K-12, Problem Solving, Teaching Tools

Cubelets

from Modular Robotics
from Modular Robotics

So, weirdly, today’s “Gifts for the Gifted” post has to do with cubes – again.  If you have been reading my last few Friday posts, you may have noticed this pattern. It was not pre-determined, I promise.  In fact, when I realized the odd coincidence, I almost chose another product to review for today.  However, I am just too excited about this one to wait.

In a perfect world, every child would have access to a set of Cubelets.  I cannot emphasize enough the educational value of this modular robotics system.  And the absolute fun factor is best expressed by my 5th graders today, who got to test it out for the first time.  “It’s awesome!”  “I could play this all day!”

The magnetic Cubelets easily combine to create all sorts of robots.  Each robot must have a Battery Cubelet, but that is the only requirement. Using different Sense, Action, and Think Cubelets, you can design a robot that turns on a flashlight when the room grows dark, or sounds the alarm when the temperature gets too warm.  You can make a robot that flees from your hand or one that follows it.  There are infinite possibilities.  These little cubes contain lessons in systems thinking, logic, creative problem solving, programming, engineering, and collaboration all rolled into one hands-on, interactive set.

We were fortunate enough to receive a grant from our PTA to purchase the Standard Kit, which is a hefty $520.  The kit comes with 20 cubes, and really is almost perfect for a center for small groups of 4 or less.  We ordered an additional Battery Cubelet as the kit only provides one.  This way a couple of robots can be going at the same time.

If you want to start out smaller there is the KT106 Kit, which offers 6 Cubelets for $160. Or you can go whole hog, and buy the Educator Pack, which includes 4 KT106 Kits and a Standard Kit at the educator’s discount of $999.

You can also buy Cubelets individually if you see a need to add certain types to your collection.

So far, no kid I’ve put in front of this set has wanted to leave it.  Once they do some exploring and get the gist of each Cubelet’s capability, they eat up the challenges that are listed on the Educator page – and then start thinking of their own challenges.

This is a relatively new product. (Our box says “Beta Release” on it.) There is a community forum for suggestions, and I have a feeling educators, students, and parents will have many ideas. It’s definitely a work in progress with a great future. The Education page offers some Lesson Plans and Challenges, and I predict there will be more to come.

It was interesting to see the different ways my students, who voluntarily separated themselves into small groups by gender, initially approached the Cubelets.  The boys enthusiastically attempted to build things with them immediately, while the girls started by trying to identify and organize them.  The boys would start a challenge, but go off on tangents almost immediately with new ideas, while the girls preferred a more systematic approach.  In the end, however they all agreed on two things – the awesomeness, and the need for more time with them.

If you think that your budget might be a bit too stretched by Cubelets, I urge you to try to get some funding, as we did, from another source.  Cubelets are not a “flash in the pan” type product.  They have outstanding educational value, and you will not be disappointed if you purchase them.

Below: Video of my students creating a “conveyor belt” with some of the Cubelets.

(For my gift ideas, visit my Pinterest board.)