Tag Archives: Manga High

My Favorite Online Math Sites

Many schools are out for the next two weeks, which gives teachers the opportunity to catch up on their personal lives.  Sometimes, though, teachers like to use this time for planning.  As the number of subscribers to this blog climbs, I am aware that many of you may not have had time to read all of the posts, or might have missed some of the earlier suggestions.  So, I thought this might be a good time of year to summarize and emphasize some of the most valuable resources I have reviewed so far.  Today, I would like to offer my Favorite Online Math Sites:

#3 – Math Pickle – This site has great higher order thinking activities for different grade levels.  Videos and printables are provided.

#2 – Thinking Blocks – I really like how the students can use online manipulatives in order to visualize these math problems.  The only disadvantage of this site is the inability to track the progress of students in your class.

#1 – Manga High– I have been phasing this program in with my gifted students in grades 3-5, and they are really excited about it.  This is a relatively new site, which means that there are features being added on a regular basis.  However, it already has the options for assigning lessons to your students and tracking them.  You can view their progress individually or as a class.  You can even print out progress reports for them.  This is all for free, and allows you to offer some differentiation to your students for the times when you cannot work with them individually.

If you are interested in reading my original posts on each of these resources, please click on the following:  Math Pickle, Thinking Blocks, and Manga High.

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Manga High

I learned about Manga High a few weeks ago, but wanted to explore it more before sharing it.  Now that I’ve had a chance to delve into it a little, I can’t wait for everyone else to try it!
Manga High is a free math resource for K-12.  Teachers can register entire classes, and no student e-mails are necessary to create their accounts.  Once the teacher manually adds each student, or uploads the class using a spreadsheet, the teacher can then select levels for each student to “play”.  Students can earn achievements by playing the math games.  The teacher has access to class reports, and individualized ones that would be useful for conferencing.
I’m going to start giving my gifted students in 5th grade access to it next week to pilot it.  Please let me know if you use it, and what your own feelings are about this seemingly indispensable tool!