Tag Archives: math

Scholastic Beasts

I am currently offering an online Google Classroom for some students in our district that assigns them one Digital Breakout (Math) a week for 5 weeks.  “Scholastic Beasts” is the 4th one in the series.  For the first three, you can see:

All of these are designed for 4th grade gifted and talented students.  As with the others, you can e-mail me at engagetheirminds@gmail.com with the title of the Digital Breakout if you need the answers – but I find that it’s better to not help your students too much!

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Click here to go to the Scholastic Beasts Digital Breakout!
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Kaled It!

I overheard some of my students talking about a cooking show called, “Nailed It!” and decided to make my next Digital Breakout based on that title.  Because we have been having a few glitches with Google Sites in our district, I decided to use Weebly to create this one.  “Kaled It!” is a bit harder than my 1st and 2nd Digital Breakouts.  Therefore, I thought I would give you some of the clues I just posted for my Google Classroom students: Lock 1 can be answered with “The Milk Dilemma.” Lock 2 will be found on “Shopping.” Lock 3 is answered using “Kale Pesto.” If you want to answer Lock 4, then carefully explore the “Meet the Contestants” page.

As with the first two Digital Breakouts I designed, teachers can e-mail me at engagetheirminds@gmail.com to receive the answers. (Please put the name of the Digital Breakout in the Subject line.)  However, I agree with the one teacher who told me that she enjoyed not knowing the answers because she didn’t help her students too much!

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Click here to go to the “Kaled It!” Digital Breakout

Feebo, Not Chee

Feebo, Not Chee is my latest attempt at doing a Digital Breakout.  Like the previous one, this one is designed for 4th grade students.  Ideally, they would work on it independently.  The pages are not in the same order as the clues, and there are a couple of links to external sites on this one.  If you are an educator who needs answers to this breakout, please e-mail me at engagetheirminds@gmail.com

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Feebo, Not Chee! Digital Breakout Link

Artful Maths

Yesterday’s post about the new OK Go Sandbox made me think about this blog I bookmarked awhile ago.  There is something about the juxtaposition of art and math that fascinates me, so the title of Artful Maths immediately caught my eye.  Under the “Resources” menu you can find, “Mathematical Art Lessons,” which is where I learned of the existence of “cardioids.”  Most of the lessons are accompanied by Powerpoint presentations and downloadable handouts.

Another section of the site I like offers ideas for “Puzzle Games.” This is where I found out about a free iOS game called, “Fibo,” which I am still trying to figure out.  Not all of the game suggestions are free, but you may discover a few new ones that cost little to nothing.

Artful Maths also includes links to origami resources and other mathematical interests.  There are quite a few Christmas decoration ideas on the blog, which I will need to remember for later this year.

Thanks to Clarissa Grandi (@c0mplexnumberfor sharing all of your awesome ideas!

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Artful Maths

OK Go Sandbox

If you have ever seen a music video by “OK Go,” then you cannot fail to be in awe of the band’s incredible creativity.  In every production, you can tell that they spent a lot of time on brainstorming, working hard, and having fun.  Even more notable, though, is how much math and science must be used to create these complex feats of artistic expression.

In cooperation with the Playful Learning Lab at the University of St. Thomas (seriously wish this had been a thing at my university!), OK Go has designed a new website, the OK Go Sandbox, that provides resources for educators to use with students for STEAM activities based on a few of their music videos.

Each of the music videos currently featured on the site has a link to educational materials that include free downloads, challenges for the students, additional videos, and suggested activities.  From making flipbooks to experimenting with sounds made by different “found” instruments, this resource explores the astonishing potential of merging science with art.  Some of the challenges can be used with the Google Science Journal (a free app available for both Android and iOS).

It looks like this is a dynamic project that is encouraging advice from educators, so be sure to visit this page for more information on how to get involved.

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OK Go Sandbox

Pi Day Rolls Around Again

With the month of March comes Pi Day (March 14th), and all sorts of fun activities to celebrate one of math’s most beloved numbers.  I’ve collected a few Pi Day resources over the years, but here are some more to add to the list:

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My Brain on Open-Ended Projects

Thanks to some inspiration on Twitter from Jessica Hirsch (@jhirschcusd), I thought it would be a neat idea to have my 4th grade gifted students try to create Makey Makey Operation games with shapes.  (They are on a Geometry unit in their regular classrooms, so this seemed like a good time to try it.)  As my classroom once again became a Disaster Zone Lab of Innovative Thinkers, I realized that I pretty much go through the same thought process every time we embark on these adventures. I tried to make a visual of it, which you can see below.  I ran out of space at the end, so don’t assume that these things always end on a high note…

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We will hopefully complete the project next week, and I will blog more specifics about it.  If you aren’t familiar with Makey Makey, you can see my post from earlier this year about the Onomatopeia Poetry the students created with Scratch and Makey Makey.  And yes, my brain went through the same steps for that one, too!