Category Archives: Art

Picture This Clothing

I typically post something light on Fridays, (often not connected to education) called my Phun Phriday Post.  For today’s edition, I am sharing a cute website I came across called, “Picture This Clothing.” Similar to sites like “Imaginables” and “Doodle Your Toys,” which allow you to upload a drawing that can be turned into a stuffed animal, Picture This Clothing offers dresses that can be made based on your own artwork.  All you need to do is download and print the template, color it, send a picture of the design, and order your custom dress.

Dress sizes on Picture This Clothing are children’s sizes 2-12.  The dress will cost you $49, and you can also add on identical miniature dresses for dolls.  According to the site, it will take 12-15 business days for you to receive your order.

For those of you with budding fashion designers in your household, this could be a fun way to channel their passion before you decide to purchase a sewing machine and let them loose in the fabric store to start creating their own creative wardrobes.

image from Picture This Clothing
image from Picture This Clothing

International Dot Day 2016

International Dot Day, 2016, falls on September 15-ish.  I never feel like the school year has truly begun until we celebrate Dot Day.

Here are some of my past posts about Dot Day:

I hunted on Pinterest to find some ideas I hadn’t seen before, and this is what I found:

There are plenty more creative people out there with Dot Day activities to share.  So, don’t forget to get out there and, “Make your Mark!”

image from Flickr
image from Flickr

I Love You the Mauvest

Mother’s Day is right around the corner, and I have been looking for some writing activities to do with my gifted Kinders and Firsts.  I found several great ideas, and thought I should share them with you in case you are looking, too!

Two of the lessons are from one of my favorite gifted teacher bloggers, Joelle Trayers.  She teaches gifted Kinders this year, and always has incredible examples of ways to draw out the creativity of her students.  One of her past Mother’s Day projects was to have the students do GT Frames about their moms.  Using 4 of the icons from Kaplan’s Depth and Complexity, Joelle has her students write about their moms using: Unanswered Questions, Rules, Multiple Perspectives, and Big Idea.  You can see some great student products here.  For a second (and just as adorable) project suggestion, check out the Top 10 Lists Joelle’s students made about their moms.  Construction paper mother portraits make this completely frame-able!

A brief Google search turned up April Walker’s Mother’s Day lesson based on the book, I Love You the Purplest.  After reading the book, where a mom uses colors to describe her children when they demand to know who she loves best, students write color poems about their moms.  You can see some student examples here.  I’m thinking it would be fun to have the students use some unusual color words like “chartreuse” or “vermilion” just to add a bit of extra challenge.

While searching my own blog I found an activity I recommended to myself to do – 4 years ago.  Apparently, I found a cute printable celebrating how moms “wear many hats,” and suggested it would be fun to have students think of how their moms do many different jobs. Their mom could wear a fireman’s hat, a chef’s hat, an artist’s hat, etc…  This is one reason I blog, so I can record ideas for the following year.  Of course, it would probably help if I actually looked at my previous posts a little bit more frequently than every four years.

Now I have a plethora of ideas for Mother’s Day.  It’s good that I teach more than one grade level because I’m inspired to try out each one!

I Love You the Purplest

What Made Me

I was recently doing research for an article and ran across this fabulous public art installation.  Wouldn’t this be cool to adapt for a classroom?  I don’t think that I can legally post any of the pics on my blog, but definitely check out the ones here, and comment below if you have ideas for classroom use!

bitmoji-20160412212034

Spectacular Sculptures

One app that I use for digital curation is Flipboard.  This app allows me to create my own digital magazines where I can collect links on various themes.  My “Fun Friday” magazine, for example, is where I add anything that looks cool, but isn’t especially educational.  As I was going through “Fun Friday” this week, I noticed that several articles were about unusual types of sculptures, so I decided to do a themed Phun Phriday post today:

Hollow: What Rushes Through Every Mind, image from the Mori Art Museum on Flickr.  Creative Commons License
Hollow: What Rushes Through Every Mind, image from the Mori Art Museum on Flickr. Creative Commons License

3d Printed Mandalas

My 4th grade gifted class is learning about mathematical masterpieces, talking about the symbolism of the circle, and discussing immortality as we read Tuck Everlasting.  I usually integrate a short project on mandalas as a culminating activity during this time of year, since their symbolism fits so well with the other facets of our study.  With a new 3d printer in our classroom, and students anxious to design, I gave them the option of creating their own mandalas in Tinkercad to print on our Polar 3d.  The one you see below is our first successful printed mandala.  We are still working on how we want to fill in the holes.  Traditional mandalas are made with colored sand, so we want to find a way to simulate that, yet retain the printed outline.  I will keep you posted on our journey to the final product! (Here is an interesting time-lapse video of the creation and destruction of a traditional mandala.)

Mandala

SXSWedu 2016 – Smithsonian Learning Lab

One of the interesting new resources I discovered at SXSWedu this year is the Smithsonian Learning Lab.  This ambitious project spearheaded by The Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access aims to give unprecedented access to the massive collections that have been digitized at the Smithsonian’s network of museums and research centers.  You can learn more about the Learning Lab’s intended mission here.

The Learning Lab offers images, recordings, and texts that you can, as a free registered member, curate into your own collections.  You can then annotate and make notes in your collection.  Adding your own files to the collection is another noteworthy feature. Collections can be shared, and teachers can assign collections to students in their rosters (similar to Google Classroom).  Here is a link to how teachers can use the Learning Lab.

Students under 13 need special permission to create collections of their own.  However, an elementary teacher could certainly benefit from using the images and other resources to supplement lessons. In a way, this Learning Lab is another type of virtual field trip, allowing students to see high resolution images of objects that might not even be on display at the museum any longer.

Here is a picture I found to place in my “Inventions” collection.  Any guesses as to the purpose of this object?

Image from Smithsonian Learning Lab: National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center
Image from Smithsonian Learning Lab: National Museum of American History, Kenneth E. Behring Center