Category Archives: Bloom’s Taxonomy

Stick Pick (Reblog)

I originally posted this 5 years ago.  I was recently discussing it with my colleagues because we are trying to work on better questioning, and thought it couldn’t hurt to reblog about this app.
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Stick Pick is an app with great potential as a teacher tool. The teacher can add one or more classes within the app. To each class, the teacher adds individual student names, determining the type and level of questioning to use for each student from the following categories: Bloom’s Taxonomy, Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy, or ESL. Once all students are entered, their sticks appear in a cup from which the teacher can randomly or purposefully choose names. As each student is chosen, a list of question stems from their particular assigned level appears on the screen. This is a wonderful way for teachers to differentiate impromptu questions for students.

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SOLO Taxonomy

SOLO stands for “Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes”.  I came across this taxonomy when I was researching another resource that I will be offering in tomorrow’s post.  I thought it might be helpful to offer this one first just in case you, like me, have never heard of SOLO.

The graphic below, taken from the Otonga Primary School blog, gives an overview of SOLO:

 

I highly recommend that you visit the Otonga Primary School site, as it gives great examples of each of the thinking stages.

Some of you may note that this looks a bit like Bloom’s Taxonomy.  I noticed this, too.  So, I dug a bit deeper to try to find the difference, and discovered this page by Pam Hook that outlines what she considers to be the advantages of SOLO over Bloom’s.  I am not certain I agree with all of her statements, particularly that Bloom’s Taxonomy is more for teacher use than student use, but this post does help to clarify some of the differences.

I have not had professional development with SOLO, so I cannot speak to its effectiveness, but I do think that it is an interesting concept, and I am particularly intrigued by the Relational stage, which I will discuss more in tomorrow’s post.

 

The New Differentiator

Ian over at byrdseed.com has revised his Differentiator tool, and it looks great.  This is a great resource for teachers (or students who are good at working independently), allowing you to target different thinking skills for groups of students based on their needs.  You can add depth and complexity to the required content, offer up different choices for resources or products, and select the number of students in each group.  The best part?  It now works on iPads! (I previously mentioned this tool in my “Extend-a-Menu” post.)

Flipping Bloom’s Taxonomy

from http://plpnetwork.com/2012/05/15/flipping-blooms-taxonomy/

In “Flipping Bloom’s Taxonomy“, Shelley Wright proposes that, in the 21st century, our students would benefit more by beginning with “Creating” and working their way to “Remembering”.  She gives some great examples of how this can be applied in the classroom in her article.  The concept seems to be both simple and revolutionary at the same time.  Her final statement is that, “Blooms 21 actively places learning where it should be, in the hands of the learner.”  If that is the result of this approach, it seems to me that it is well worth trying.

Shape Collage

Shape Collage is a free app for iDevices that allows the user to use photos on the device to create collages in different shapes, such as stars, paw prints, puzzle pieces, etc…  You can even type in your own text, and the photos will conform to the words. Once you have created the collage, you can save it to your Photo Album, or share it via Facebook, Twitter, or e-mail.  If you do not have an iDevice, there is a similar program online called Loupe.  The biggest difference between the app and the website is that, on Loupe, you are loading your pictures from an online sharing site, and do not have the option to load them directly from your computer.

Shape Collage is a great app for Creating, the highest level of Bloom’s New Taxonomy.  Students can create collages that conform to shapes related to what they are studying, or the shape of a text that gives a meaningful message.  The collages can be another way for students to express themselves poetically with pictures.

Bloom’s Taxonomy Quicksheets

These Bloom’s Taxonomy Quicksheets, created by Andrew Churches at Edorigami, are a great teacher tool for quick reference on how to integrate technology and higher order thinking skills effectively.  Each Bloom’s level has its own sheet, and recommends technology activities and websites that address the needs for that level.  This is a great companion to Bloom’s Taxonomy Tech Pyramid.

Mrs. Sunda’s Literature Links

If you are trying to allow some of your students who are reading at a higher level to work independently, you might find these literature units helpful.  There are only 6, but they include discussion guides written with Bloom’s Taxonomy in mind.  Another great thing about these materials is that they were created by students.  Not only could some of your students work through the units, but they could use them as examples for developing some of their own.  While you are visiting Mrs. Sunda’s site, check out some of her other links.  Many resources are given for teachers, including a link to a detailed article explaining the process behind the literature units.