SEL and Community Building With Slides

In yesterday’s post about Virtual Breakout rooms, I mentioned that students who don’t like this virtual version of small group work feel awkward, especially if they have not built connections with the teacher and their peers before being thrown into small groups.  Today’s post offers you some resources to help your students with some of the social-emotional aspects of being in school in order to begin building those bridges.

SEL

If you have the version of PearDeck that allows for “Draggable” responses, you can have your students show their current emotional status using a Google Slide like this one created by Stephanie Rothstein (@Steph_EdTech) and her student teacher, inspired by her LEAD Pathway Co-Chair, Rachel Peters (@lghspeters ).  (You can also make your own hack for draggable responses by: making this your background or creating a master slide with it, creating your own dot, copying and pasting it numerous times until you have enough for the class to drag when you share the presentation.)

stress check

If you don’t have the full version of PearDeck, you can make your own hack for draggable responses by: making this your background or creating a master slide with it, creating your own dot, copying and pasting it numerous times until you have enough for the class to drag when you share the presentation.  You can also find some more SEL templates from PearDeck that are free to download here.

Copy of Social Emotional Learning Templates

For a Google Slides Choiceboard on SEL, try this one from Pathways 2 Success.

Do you want a virtual calming room?  Lindsey Denbo (@denbo_lindsey) shared the template for this amazing Slides presentation:

copy-of-calming-room
Calming Room Slides with Links from Lindsey Denbo

Community Building

Ester Park (@MrsParkShine), who I also added to my Interactive Slides post because of her bank of templates that can be easily adapted for many uses, has this fun sign-off questions template.

Sign Off Question

You can also find various Check-In templates on Mrs. Park’s site, as well as interactive games.

Speaking of games, check out this clever Quarantine Lucky Charms game from John Meehan (@MeehanEdu).  You can find more templates with games here.

Did you create a Bitmoji Classroom?  Many teachers are allowing their students to create Bitmoji Lockers.  Due to age and access issues, some teachers are giving students banks of Bitmojis to choose from.  Adding some personal flair to their own projects, and sharing them can give the teacher and their classmates insight into individual personalities so they can discover commonalities and unique attributes in each other.

PearDeck also has free Community Building Templates, which you can access here.

If you have any other SEL or Community Building ideas for virtual learning, please share them in the Comments Section!

100cameras

 

photo credit: http://www.100cameras.org

Here is the basic premise of 100cameras:

The model is simple, bringing change full circle. 100cameras..

 ..identifies communities that are home to marginalized children

..partners with child-centered organizations that are successfully solving local problems

..provides art education by teaching children how to tell their stories through photography

..amplifies their voice by sharing their perspectives with the world

..empowers their story to raise awareness and funds to impact their own communities.

The photos on this site are powerful, and I love that they are taken by children in their own environments.  Seeing the world through their eyes is amazing.  Offering the prints for purchase gives the students a genuine voice.  This is a wonderful idea.  If you are interested in partnering with 100cameras to bring this project to your community, visit this page.

I can also visualize many ways that this concept can be adapted for the classroom or for a school.  The best thing about this is putting the cameras into the hands of the students.  Let them tell a story with pictures.  Let them display it to an audience.  And let them receive feedback for their work.  Engage their minds, and let them be heard.