Tag Archives: language arts

S.C.O.R.E. Cyberguides

S.C.O.R.E. Cyberguides is a site that was produced by Schools of California Online Resources for Education.  It is based on California’s Language Arts curriculum, and offers a multitude of  literature units at levels from K-12.  The units include teacher and student resources.  They could be used as supplemental materials, or as jumping off points for Literature Circles or independent study assignments.  There is a disclaimer on the site that lack of funding has resulted in some of the units being out of date (broken links, etc…).  However, it appears that even those units are still available on the site under “Retired” sections.  This is helpful as a teacher could scavenge them for curriculum ideas or website suggestions.

UPDATE 7/6/14:  It looks like this link no longer works.  If any of you find a link to these guides that does work, please let me know, as they are a valuable resource!

Spelling City

I am not a huge fan of spelling tests, particularly when everyone in the class is responsible for the same words.  However, this site has some amazing tools that will allow you to customize lists for your students.  There are also fun games that they can play to practice those specialized lists.  The site is free, although you need to register.  There are some perks for purchasing a premium membership, but it can still be a valuable tool without all of the bells and whistles.

Surprisingly Educational Apps

Pictorial” is a free app.  I envision using it with an iPad in a center.  The app is a great way to practice spatial skills.  However, the user can choose even harder puzzles if or she finds these too easy.

The puzzles show a series of dots.  By sliding your fingers around the screen, you can manipulate the dots until you see lines connecting them.  The darker the lines become, the closer you are to creating a picture.  Once you slide the dots into the correct place, an image will appear, such as the ice cream cone in the picture to the left, and a prompt appears for the next puzzle.

A student could be asked to solve a puzzle, then identify the picture.  To increase difficulty, a student could be directed to write a sentence with the picture, or even a story.  A high level user could have the additional challenge of connecting several pictures together within a story.

A screen pic and Screen Chomp (another free app) could be used by students who have difficulty writing.  Or each student could be directed to add the title of their picture to a class brainstorming map to use for writing or creative thinking. Another possibility would be to have students add the pictures to a class mind map to be used for vocabulary and/or spelling practice.  Creative students could try to find as many ways to connect the pictures as possible or use the pictures artistically in drawing a scene.

I think this app would be appealing to students in K-5.

For more ideas on how to use apps in the classroom, please visit www.techchef4u.com, another great resource for teachers!