St. Patrick’s Day Resources 2021

I know that this will come as shock to many of you who are faithful readers, but I am feeling pretty good that I got Pi Day and St. Patrick’s Day covered this year before the end of February. Not only that, but I spent a little time today making my St. Patrick’s Day S.C.A.M.P.E.R. activity into both a Slides presentation and a Jamboard. Talk about UNPRECEDENTED!!!!! (No one needs to know that I was putting off folding laundry and doing yoga in order to achieve these magnificent accomplishments.)

If you are unfamiliar with S.C.A.M.P.E.R., here is a previous post where I explain the acronym. You might also note that the paper version of St. Patrick’s Day S.C.A.M.P.E.R. is for sale on my TPT page, but don’t waste your money on that, since you can just download the Slides and print it out if you want. For free! I’m working on updating all of my resources and making them free because that is exactly how much housework and exercise I am willing to sacrifice for you.

And that’s not all! I noticed that quite a few of my St. Patrick’s Day resource links were not working anymore (not surprising, since I’ve been publishing this blog for nearly nine years), so I gathered updated versions in this Wakelet for you.

Now I must go scour the March calendar to see what I’ve forgotten…

Leonardo the Leprechaun

I mentioned that I would be trying to create some digital breakouts when I posted this.  Leonardo the Leprechaun is my first attempt, and I thought I would share it with those of you who might be able to use it this week in time for St. Patrick’s Day.

I should tell you that I have already asked my 4th and 5th graders to give this a try, and I made some changes each time based on their feedback.  We definitely had some major issues – one of them being that the new Google Sites is currently blocked in our district.  If your students are unable to access the link, that is probably why, unfortunately.  The other glitches were all my fault, but I’ve hopefully fixed them!

Your students may want to write down the answers they get for each clue, as they will all need to be submitted at the same time in the Google Form.  Answers: 79, 550, 1732, POLYGON

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

leonardosite
Click here to get to this Digital Breakout!

SCAMPERing Outside the Rainbow

It has been awhile (2013!) since I posted some St. Patrick’s Day S.C.A.M.P.E.R.  ideas.   S.C.A.M.P.E.R. is an acronym to help people to remember different ways inventive ideas can happen:  Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify, Put to Another Use, and Rearrange.  It was originally developed by a man named Roger Eberle.  Here is a link to a post I did about S.C.A.M.P.E.R.

My 2nd graders worked on using “Combine” and “Put to Another Use” this week.  For “Combine,” they invented something new with a clock and a four-leaf-clover. (I love how the clock hands will pinch you if you aren’t wearing green!)  The “Put to Another Use” assignment asked the students to think of another way to use a Leprechaun hat.

You can use these ideas in your own classroom, as well as the ones on my original post, with any drawing paper or even as writing prompts.

For more St. Patrick’s ideas, don’t forget to check out yesterday’s post!

Photo Mar 06, 1 06 04 PMPhoto Mar 06, 1 07 41 PMPhoto Mar 06, 1 08 59 PMPhoto Mar 06, 1 08 15 PM

Are Leprechauns Real?

My Kinder students have made leprechaun traps for the last few years, and it always amuses me as they get older and sadly reminisce that they didn’t catch any leprechauns.  I’m never quite sure who is fooling who – are they just trying to make me believe that they believe, or are we all just making believe?

Just in case your students have some residual doubt, you can assign them this Wonderopolis article.

Students in upper elementary might scoff at leprechauns, but may be interested in doing some St. Patrick’s Day magnetic poetry.  You can also try this free “Irish” creative writing kit.

With this search I did on Teachers Pay Teachers, I found several free St. Patrick’s Day logic puzzles for various ages.

For those kinesthetic/spatial students, here is a lesson on shamrock origami.

I always feel a bit cheated because Pi Day and St. Patrick’s Day fall during our Spring Break – but I’m sure I’ll find a way to sneak some of these activities in anyway!

Copy of Copy of St. Patrick's Day Magnetic Poetry.jpg

Begin at the End of the Rainbow

With St. Patrick’s Day coming up, I have been doing a few leprechaun activities with my students.  One that my 1st graders enjoy is to use the “Substitute” tool from S.C.A.M.P.E.R. to imagine what they would like to find at the end of the rainbow instead of a pot of gold.  This year, one student drew a puppy that solves Rubix Cubes.  That was definitely “out of the pot” thinking!  My 2nd graders “Adapted” a classroom to leprechauns, and included posters that instructed the leprechaun students, “How to Talk to Humans.”

The hands-down favorite St. Patrick’s Day activity for my students has always been the Leprechaun Traps.  I usually do this with my Kindergartners.  The other day, my 2nd graders were recalling the excitement of making the traps and speculating that “probably Mrs. Eichholz was the one who left the notes – not a leprechaun.”  🙂  I’m looking forward to introducing my newest group of Kinders to the Design Process and STEM as they invent their own leprechaun traps.

Breakout Edu has a couple of Leprechaun games on their Seasonal page. (Remember that you need to register for free in order to get the password that opens the full set of instructions.)

Technology Rocks. Seriously. has a grand collection of leprechaun activities that include digital and paper links.

And, as if that is not enough, the MilkandCookies blog offers a free download of St. Patrick’s Day logic and sudoku puzzles here.

I wish everyone the Luck of the Irish this March, and I hope you discover your own pot of gold in the near future.  (If it’s a puppy who can solve Rubix Cubes, please send him to my house because I’ve never been able to complete one without cheating.)

rainbow
image from: echaroo on Flickr

Leprechaun Traps and Other Shenanigans (Reblog)

This is my St. Patrick’s Day post from last year.  I’m trying to post it in plenty of time so you can use it for the holiday if you like.

A couple of years ago I posted about the cute idea that I’d found on several websites of having students build leprechaun traps.   Since my Kinders were learning about Inventor Thinking around that time, we tried it out.  They were very earnest about creating efficient traps, and I’m pretty sure at least one of the students was disappointed that he didn’t catch his prey.  You can see our class blog posts from that year here and here.

Here is an updated list of St. Patrick’s Day links in case you want to try to capture your own leprechaun this year – or, better yet, his pot of gold:

Not enough?  Technology Rocks. Seriously has way more St. Patrick’s Day links.

If you’re looking for additional resources, I also have a St. Patrick’s Day Sudoku Packet ($1) and a S.C.A.M.P.E.R. Packet ($2) available for download on Teachers Pay Teachers.

image from: Sunflower Lily on Flickr
Leprechaun Trap image from: Sunflower Lily on Flickr