Tag Archives: videos

BrainPop: Black Lives Matter Protests

BrainPop has created an excellent animated video that explains the protests for Black Lives Matter.  It is accompanied by a blog post that offers tips for discussing related topics with young people, and a video discussion guide. This is a fairly recent addition to the BrainPop archives, as it refers to the death of George Floyd and other current events.  You may prefer to read quickly through the transcript instead of watching the video to determine if it is appropriate for your target audience.

This post is part of a weekly Black Lives Matter series that I have vowed to include on this blog.  Here are the previous posts:

Black Lives Matter
Image by S B from Pixabay

Cleveland Metroparks Zoo and Cincinnati Zoo Facebook Lives

If you can’t go to the zoo, the zoo will come to you!  Each weekday, at 11 am (EDT), the Cleveland Metroparks Zoo is presenting a Virtual Classroom experience using Facebook Live.  From what I can tell, a couple of the previous experiences (meeting alpacas and bathing an elephant) are archived on the Facebook page.  According to comments, requests have been made to also make them available somewhere else so that people who do not have Facebook can still view them.  You can also find some archived videos along with lesson plans on this page.

The Cincinnati Zoo is also providing Facebook Live Safaris.  These are happening at 3 PM (EDT) each weekday, but you can also access past videos along with suggested home activities on this page.

There are many more, but I’m trying not to overwhelm readers with too many resources in one post.  Thanks to all of you out there who are keeping our students engaged during these tough times!

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Image by mmcclain90 from Pixabay

Class Hook

In yesterday’s post about a website that archives short video animations for kids I mentioned that I would be writing about another source for videos to use in the classroom.  The site is called, “Class Hook,” and I have mentioned it before in a post about using video clips.  That post gave information about some tools that you can use to make your own clips if you are trying to use parts of longer films.  But Class Hook actually provides clips for you.

I have worked in two different school districts, and one of them blocked Class Hook, so definitely try it out on campus before you choose to rely on it for a lesson.  Even if it doesn’t work at school, you can still use it at home to find clips relevant to your content.  Most of the clips come from videos already accessible on YouTube, which can be a work-around (if YouTube isn’t also blocked!).  Class Hook’s tools will allow you to quickly narrow down the unlimited content that you would find in a Google search to a few suggestions.

Class Hook has a tiered pricing plan, but I can only tell you about my experience with the free version, which was perfectly adequate for my needs.  On this plan, you can browse all of the clips, filter by grade strands, clip length, and by series.  You can also choose a subject or search for a topic and create playlists.

An example of how I used Class Hook in class was when I was searching for a clip for my Engineering class.  I knew there was something in Apollo 13 that I had once thought would be perfect, but I couldn’t remember the exact part of the movie.  A quick search on Class Hook revealed, “A Square Peg in a Round Hole,” which was exactly what I was looking for.

For ideas on possible uses for Class Hook, take a look a this page.  I doubt you will need it, though, as I’m sure you will see many potential benefits of this tool once you try it.

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Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

What You Missed This Summer – Inspirational Videos

I know that my readership takes a dip June-August each year as many educators go on vacations or take breaks during those months.  Although I did not post as regularly as I meant to this summer, I did share some resources that I believe are worth repeating in case you missed them.  I am going to spend this week spotlighting some of those.

I already shared the Jennie Magiera video this week, but here are some others that I posted this summer that you may have missed:

As always, you can find hundreds more Inspirational Videos for Students and Inspirational Videos for Teachers on my Pinterest Boards!

Graduation Inspiration (Reblog)

This is a reblog of a post I originally published in 2015. 

As graduation season rolls around once again, I thought I would compile a list of videos that I’ve found over the years that eloquently describe the hopes and dreams I have for my students in the future. I’ve placed the length of each video beside it.  Not all of these are graduation speeches, but they all give one or more of the following messages: Be Kind, Work Hard, and Make the Most of Your Time and Abilities.  Most of these videos (and many more) can be found on my “Inspirational Videos for Students” Pinterest Board.  As always, please preview any video before you show it to your students.

graduation

Thoughts on Kindness from George Saunders (2:12)

Making It from StoryCorps (2:43)

If You’ve Never Failed, You’ve Never Lived (1:16)

Ashton Kutcher’s Teen Choice Award Speech (4:40), Ashton Kutcher on his Teen Choice Speech (3:15) – better for older students

The Time You Have in Jellybeans (2:44)

212: The Extra Degree Inspirational Movie (2:59)

Kid President Graduation Speech (4:12)

The Real Purpose of Your Life (2:18)

These last two are my all-time favorite videos to show departing students:

Jeff Bezos at Princeton (18:44 – his part starts around 6:27)

Mark Bezos: A Life Lesson from a Volunteer Firefighter (4:40)

For more resources, Amy Borovoy curated a wonderful list last May for Edutopia. You can find it here.

The Present

Our family just adopted a puppy who is part schnauzer and part jet engine.  She officially belongs to my daughter, who is doing her best to be a responsible parent.  Every morning, when my daughter gets up, I’ll hear a “wop” against our bedroom door, and open it to be assailed by the joyful bundle of leaps and bounds and licks and nibbles who seems to enjoy life even more than Will Ferrell in Elf.

So, when I ran across The Present on TheKidShouldSeeThis blog, I got a bit angry at the boy who treats his new puppy with disdain. There are some powerful messages about empathy and growth mindset in this compact video (and a happy ending), however, that could make for great class discussions.

For more inspirational videos for students, check out this Pinterest Board.

image from The Present by Jacob Frey
image from The Present by Jacob Frey
One of the few times our puppy isn't leaping all over the bulldog, grabbing his jowls and nipping at his ears.
One of the few times our puppy isn’t leaping all over the bulldog, grabbing his jowls and nipping at his ears.