Tag Archives: science

Kids’ Science Challenge

Free Technology 4 Teachers recently had post about this great website from the National Science Foundation.  Be sure to check out Richard Byrne’s description of the site.  And, when you visit the site, don’t miss the neat brainstorming tool and the information for parents and teachers.

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Wonderville

This site from the Science Alberta Foundation describes itself as follows:  “Wonderville is a fun, interactive destination for kids to discover the exciting world of science. This award-winning site encourages exploration and curiosity, while helping kids discover how much fun science can be.”  The site include videos, games, comics, and other activities about topics such as “Milk Mystery” and “Tree Cookies”.  This would be a great link for a teacher to suggest to parents, or to use as a supplemental resource in the classroom.

Interactive Sink and Float Video

O.K.  It’s Sesame Street.  But you would be surprised how engaged kids of all ages can be by this series of linked videos that allow the viewer to make choices that determine the next video that will be watched.  An experiment showing whether or not different objects float is the purpose of the video.  However, it could also be used as a general lesson that demonstrates the Scientific Process.  If you enjoy this interactive video experience, and would like to learn how to make your own set of videos that link together, you can find some very simple instructions here.

Bubble Ball

Bubble Ball is one of my favorite iDevice apps.  It is a free download, and has 48 levels.  You can purchase more after you finish the 48  for  99 cents.  The purpose of this game is to use the various materials that appear on the screen in each level to direct a ball to roll toward a flag.  I don’t usually like to recommend game apps for the classroom, because students seem to get enough of those at home.  But this Physics challenge encourages problem solving and creative thinking.  Many of the levels have more than one solution.  This could be a fun center in which the students could take screen shots of their solutions and explain them using the free Screen Chomp app or other methods.  It would be interesting to compare the different solutions groups develop, and have them explain their thought processes.  Of course, I highly recommend that you play around with the app yourself – just to get familiar with the levels, of course 😉