Tag Archives: sudoku

Halloween Treats That Won’t Give You Cavities

As if American politics aren’t scary enough, the United States celebrates Halloween next Monday, which is all kind of wrong – because spending a day with students who can’t wait to trick-or-treat plus 4 more days after they fill up on sugary candy should not be required of any teacher if you are at all interested in helping him or her maintain a semblance of sanity.

The president I would vote for would resolve to make Halloween on a Saturday for the rest of eternity, but so far I haven’t seen that mentioned in anyone’s campaign.

For those of you who are in the same boat (or should I say, riding the same broom?), here are some resources I’ve collected in the past that might help to briefly engage your students in something other than daydreaming about all of the candy they will need to confess to eating at their next dental appointment:

Check back tomorrow for another virtual pumpkin carving idea!

Click her to get to the free QuiverVision Augmented Reality Pumpkin download
Click here to get to the free QuiverVision Augmented Reality Pumpkin download

 

 

Halloween Sudoku

I have a third grade student who brings a pad of sudoku puzzles out to recess each day. Any time there is a possible treat on the horizon, some of my second graders call out, “Can it be a sudoku puzzle?”

So if, like my students, yours also love these logic puzzles, here is a Halloween Sudoku¬†you could try this week. ¬†It could be fun whole-class on an interactive white board, or as a station. ¬†Be sure to click on the settings gear on the bottom right corner, so you can choose the appropriate level. ¬†Something that I like about this particular site is that, once you finish, you are given another challenge – so it’s not just a one-shot deal.

For more digital activities with an October theme, check out Laura Moore’s amazing Listly that includes some spooky magnetic poetry and more!

Halloween Sudoku

Leprechaun Traps and Other Shenanigans

A couple of years ago I posted about the cute idea that I’d found on several websites of having students build leprechaun traps. ¬† Since my Kinders were learning about Inventor Thinking around that time, we tried it out. ¬†They were very earnest about creating efficient traps, and I’m pretty sure at least one of the students was disappointed that he didn’t catch his prey. ¬†You can see our class blog posts from that year here and here.

Here is an updated list of St. Patrick’s Day links in case you want to try to capture your own leprechaun this year – or, better yet, his pot of gold:

Not enough? ¬†Technology Rocks. Seriously has way more St. Patrick’s Day links.

If you’re looking for additional resources, I also have a St. Patrick’s Day Sudoku Packet ($1) and a S.C.A.M.P.E.R. Packet ($2) available for download on Teachers Pay Teachers.

image from: Sunflower Lily on Flickr
Leprechaun Trap image from: Sunflower Lily on Flickr

Love Doesn’t Always Defy Logic

I was going to title this post, “VD is Making me ADD.” Fortunately I realized that was a bad idea – for so many reasons.

Well, I kind of lied. ¬†I have been saying for two days that all of my posts this week would be about the TCEA conference I attended last week. ¬†But then one Valentine resource popped up. ¬†And then another. ¬† And I thought that some of you might actually want to learn about them before Valentine’s Day which, of course, for those of us in the U.S. who follow the Hallmark Holiday Calendar, is this coming Saturday.

Even though it’s not my favorite holiday, Valentine’s Day does lend itself to some fun classroom activities. ¬† I’ve already posted a bunch of resources. ¬†It’s kind of sad, actually, that I have more¬†links to Valentine’s Day resources than Presidents’ Day. ¬†I think it’s a silent rebellion against working ¬†on a day that the students get a holiday…

Anyway, here are¬†a couple more to add to the list of ways to have fun ¬†teach critical thinking and problem solving skills that are vital for standardized testing ūüėČ

Valentine’s Day Sudoku – I have some other links to online and printable sudoku puzzles here, but these free printables are particularly well-suited for Kinder and 1st graders.

Hopscotch Hearts – I thought it would be fun for my students to use Hopscotch (the iPad coding app) to make something Valentine-y, and they have been working on their own ideas on and off for a couple of weeks. ¬†(You can see what a few of my 2nd graders have done so far here – most of them haven’t finished, yet.) ¬†Then I saw a tweet from Hopscotch about a new tutorial they just posted to make a “Pixel Art Heart.” ¬†My 3rd graders tried it out yesterday and really liked it. ¬†A few of them finished the code and then started modifying it to make the heart bigger or smaller as well as different colors. ¬†A couple of other students messed up on the code and I loved watching their peers working with them to try to figure out where they went wrong. (Because I had absolutely no idea!)

So those are my two off-task suggestions for today. ¬†I would promise that I’ll be back to the plan tomorrow, but who knows what will capture my attention between now and then?

Pixel Art Heart

 

Logical Ways to Survive the Weeks Before Winter Break

Full disclosure: this first week of December is going to be my busiest week this year. Therefore, I decided to cheat a bit for a few days and recycle some posts from last year. I’ve done a bit of editing to make sure they remain current but otherwise they are the same. Hopefully you still find them useful!

Screen Shot from Winter Sudoku
Screen Shot from Winter Sudoku

Yesterday, I posted some “Creative Ways to Survive the Week Before Winter Break.” But maybe you¬†have a group of students (or even a handful) who have a decided preference for logical thinking challenges, so here are some resources:

One resource I always forget to check (even though I have products listed on there!) is Teachers Pay Teachers.  Here are some free logic packets you might want to download:

This one is NOT free (currently $8), but it’s 213 pages, and chock full of critical thinking activities for 1st-3rd. ¬†Personally, I think it’s well worth the money for this set of “Christmas Critical Thinking Puzzles,” that includes: ¬†Primarily Christmas Logic,¬†Christmas Logic with a String of Lights,¬†Christmas Analogies,¬†Christmas Which One Doesn’t Belong?* ¬†I do not know Susan Morrow, the author of this set – and I am certainly not getting any money for advertising her product. ¬†But, I think it’s a great deal. ¬†Quite frankly, I am very jealous of her talent ūüėČ

*You can also purchase a few of the included puzzle packs separately, if you prefer.

Another idea, which I plan to try with my older kids, is to have them design some Winter Kodable mazes (similar to the app), along with the coding solutions. ¬†This will let them use a bit of creativity along with their logical thinking skills! (By the way, don’t forget about Hour of Code next week!)

More in this series:

Creative Ways to Survive the Weeks Before Winter Break!
Physical Ways to Survive the Weeks Before Winter Break!
Telegenic Ways to Survive the Weeks Before Winter Break!

It’s Like a Box of Chocolates – but Not as Caloric

Chocolate Fix Logic Game from ThinkFun (for 8+)
Chocolate Fix Logic Game from ThinkFun (for 8+)

Since I only see most of my students once a week, I have to think ahead when it comes to holidays. ¬†It suddenly struck me that we are in the middle of January, and I haven’t given thought to Valentine’s Day, yet. ¬†So, I culled together a bunch of resources to offer to you in advance.

And finally, I came across this last one, and almost leapt out of my seat. ¬†If any of you participated in the Global Cardboard Challenge this year, then you know how much the students love making new things with boxes! ¬†In fact, I had a parent e-mail pictures of her son this weekend as he fashioned a large box they had received at home into a mini putt-putt course. ¬†According to her, he said, “After GT, I don’t see cardboard the same way.”

So, if you are looking for another Cardboard Challenge to energize your kids (or didn’t get the chance to participate in October), here is a cool idea for a Valentine’s Day Box Project from Amanda at One Extra Degree.

UPDATE 1/15/15: If you want even more ideas for Valentine’s Day, check out this year’s post!

Logical Ways to Survive the Week Before Winter Break

Screen Shot from Winter Sudoku
Screen Shot from Winter Sudoku

Yesterday, I posted some “Creative Ways to Survive the Week Before Winter Break.” Interestingly, I used a couple of the ideas in centers with my 2nd graders yesterday, and none of them chose them! ¬†Instead, they flocked toward the logical activities around the room. ¬†So, just in case you, too, have a group of students (or even a handful) who have a decided preference for logical thinking challenges, here are some resources:

One resource I always forget to check (even though I have products listed on there!) is Teachers Pay Teachers.  Here are some free logic packets you might want to download:

This one is NOT free (currently $10), but it’s 213 pages, and chock full of critical thinking activities for 1st-3rd. ¬†Personally, I think it’s well worth the money for this set of “Christmas Critical Thinking Puzzles,” that includes: ¬†Primarily Christmas Logic,¬†Christmas Logic with a String of Lights,¬†Christmas Analogies,¬†Christmas Which One Doesn’t Belong?* ¬†I do not know Susan Morrow, the author of this set – and I am certainly not getting any money for advertising her product. ¬†But, I think it’s a great deal. ¬†Quite frankly, I am very jealous of her talent ūüėČ

*You can also purchase a few of the included puzzle packs separately, if you prefer.

Another idea, which I plan to try with my older kids, is to have them design some Winter Kodable mazes (similar to the app), along with the coding solutions.  This will let them use a bit of creativity along with their logical thinking skills!

More in this series:

Creative Ways to Survive the Week Before Winter Break!

Physical Ways to Survive the Week Before Winter Break!